APRIL 27-30, 2020

HILTON MISSISSAUGA, ONTARIO

APRIL 27-30, 2020 - HILTON MISSISSAUGA, ONTARIO

8:00 – 17:00

TRADE SHOW

Graydon Foyer and McCallion A-B

7:30 – 8:30

Continental Breakfast

Graydon Ballroom

8:30 – 9:30

Roundtable

GRAYDON BALLROOM


eMobility and Policies

Policies and their resulting programs and actions are crucial to the adoption of eMobility in all modes of transport.  The participants will explain their jurisdiction’s experiences in adopting and implementing eMobility policies, legislation and regulations.

Moderator: Travis Allan, Vice President, FLO, Mississauga ON 

Speakers: 

  • Paula Vieira, Director, Transportation and Alternative Fuels Division, Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa ON 
  • Christina Ianniciello, Director, Clean Transportation Branch, Ministry of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources, Government of British Columbia, Victoria BC
  • Representative of Transport Québec

9:30 – 10:00

NETWORKING BREAK

10:00 – 11:30

TS10 – Vehicle design: What is the latest research in electric powertrain and other vehicle innovation?

Research and Innovation: Pre-commercial Technologies

Moderator:
Eddy Zuppel
Program Leader, National Research Council

TS10.1 BATTERY MANAGEMENT ADVANCEMENTS FOR ELECTRIC VEHICLES COST OF OWNERSHIP OPTIMIZATION

Presenter(s): Soeren Striepe, Magna International, Aurora ON

Li-Ion batteries are subject to degradation with time and use, which impacts, energy capacity, power capabilities, efficiency and is also a safety consideration.
Li-Ion battery aging is affected by factors, such as

  • design,
  • manufacturing quality,
  • loads and defined operation limits.

Battery management systems have the function to monitor degradation and control performance, utilizing operational data (e.g. voltage, temperature measurements) and pre-determined aging models mostly generated in development testing.
Advanced methods of on-board diagnostics and adaptive control are being developed and introduced, aiming at optimized battery design, extended life, improved performance and reduced cost.

This includes

  • emerging, cloud-connected approaches based on aggregation of captured load and degradation data with option to Over-the-Air updates of operating parameters, and
  • recently discussed, higher accuracy on-board State-of-Health measurement technologies.

This presentation will have a look at the value propositions of these approaches in the context of optimizing the integrated powertrain and complete vehicle system.

TS10.2 COMPUTERS ON WHEELS – AUTOMOTIVE MACRO TRENDS AND THEIR IMPACT ON AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRONICS

Presenter(s): Falk Meissner, Roland Berger, Chicago IL, USA

Four macro trends are driving fundamental changes in the automotive industry and across the transportation ecosystem: New Mobility business models and behaviors, the arrival of Autonomous technologies, the Digitization of the car architecture, and the rise of powertrain Electrification.

Those trends will trigger a major disruption in vehicle design and the automotive supply chain. The electronics content of the connected, autonomous and electric car is expected to increase from 16% to 35% of total automotive bill of materials between 2019 and 2025. This drastic shift will require a re-configuration of the automotive architecture with an increasing role of software and high-voltage components, a rethinking of each players position in the value chain, and changes to the OEMs supply strategies.

Roland Berger will provide an overview of the MADE trends and their expected impact to the automotive electronics landscape.

TS10.3 NOVELTIES IN ELECTRIC MOTOR DESIGN AND MATERIALS

Presenter(s): Jean-Michel Lamarre, National Research Council, Boucherville QC

Rapid changes in the field of vehicle electrification have highlighted the need for innovative materials, new configurations and advanced fabrication techniques for the development of electromagnetic systems with enhanced performance. In particular, electric motor improvements can be achieved via creative topologies and specifically tailored materials that answer the need of different applications such as high efficiency, high torque, increased power density, compact size, high reliability, and more efficient cooling, etc. This presentation will review the latest novelties and trends in electric motor designs. Recent work highlighting the expected performance improvement that can be obtained by the use of new designs with 3D flux path will be presented. The potential of new material fabrication techniques such as additive manufacturing for the realization of complex electric motor components will also be discussed. The advantages of additive manufacturing will be illustrated via several examples of innovative configurations and cooling strategies. In order to meet the industrialization and deployment targets, these advanced manufacturing technologies need to be developed and integrated to enhance the performance of conventional electric motors while minimizing production costs.

TS10.4 INGEAR MULTI-SPEED TRANSMISSION FOR ELECTRIC VEHICLES

Presenter(s): Anthony Wong, Inmotive Inc, Toronto ON

InMotive’s inGear transmission directly addresses the biggest challenges mainstream automakers have with Electric Vehicle powertrains today – range, performance and cost. Ideally suited for EVs, its unique morphing pulley technology makes it the world’s most efficient multi speed transmission, providing double-digit improvements to range, acceleration and top speed while allowing for cost reduction by downsizing batteries and other components.
It can shift smoothly while transmitting full torque, without any slippage (clutches or rolling contact). It handles high torque, is extremely efficient and withstands the punishing duty cycles that would quickly destroy other transmissions.
The inGear is also the only transmission that allows motors to be controllable under full torque during a shift, offering the smoothest ride and the fastest acceleration while being the most efficient and robust automatic transmission in existence. The inGear’s morphing sprockets combine the efficiency and durability of a single speed gearbox with the functionality and performance of a multi speed transmission.

TS10.5 ROLLING CHASSIS – BOSCH E-MOBILITY PLATFORM

Presenter(s): Johannes Mutter, UAS Munich & Bosch Engineering GmbH, Holzkirchen, Germany

As part of a development cooperation with automotive-chassis expert Benteler Bosch started the “Rolling Chassis” project to show how the system integration of their newest electric components works.

E-Drive-Trains, Steering- and EV-break-system – Bosch already got suitable components in their portfolio. As the subsystems fit perfectly together in the “RC” prototype detailed tests can now be driven on the interaction of the different components which is a good basis for further development of the products according to costumers needs.

With this technology carrier Bosch pursues the goal to offer holistic EV-systems and drivetrains, instead of single componenents. Not only to strengthen the system integration expertise of Bosch, but also Bosch can now carry out more detailed market analyses on the demands of future EV-systems. With the global acceleration of electro mobility new players plan to enter the market.

Therefore with “RC” are the needs of a technology platform for those players to quickly adapt to EV-technology and implement their vehicle body design concepts or further technology developments are satisfied.

After showing “RC” at IAA and Shanghai Motorshow Bosch announced Automobili Pininfarina and Evergrand as first customers, which will use the system as platform for their future electric vehicle developments.

10:00 – 11:30

TS11 – Codes and standards and the people who use them

Policies and Programs: Accelerating Adoption

Moderator:
Maxime Charron
Founder, Leading Ahead Energy

TS11.1 PROGESS BY MEASUREMENT CANADA FOR APPROVAL STANDARD TO CERTIFY CHARGING STATIONS

Presenter(s): Mario Dupuis, Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada, Ottawa ON

An update from Measurement Canada on progress made on the development of a Canadian approval standard to certify charging stations for electric vehicles to use consumption measured imbedded metrology for the establishment of recharge fees.

TS11.2 CODES AND STANDARDS LANDSCAPE OF ELECTRIC VEHICLES AND CHARGING INFRASTRUCTURE

Presenter(s): Shahab Shokrzadeh, CSA Group, Toronto ON

A robust and harmonized set of Codes and Standards is required to help meet the projected market growth of electric vehicles (EVs), support the safe deployment of charging infrastructure, and develop a reliable management system to control the charging load of EVs on the electric grid. CSA Group has adopted a fully-integrated approach to support the development and adoption of international standards for infrastructure and vehicle interoperability. CSA Group also utilizes its recognized technical expertise to contribute to international standards development, certification, inspection, and testing services.
This paper provides an overview of the existing and under-development standards in the EV space including recent developments around electric vehicle supply equipment, plugs and connectors, and battery packs. To this end, relevant standard documents are reviewed with a focus on emerging technologies, including Electric Vehicles Energy Management System; Advanced Charging Technologies; Vehicle-to-Grid Technology; and, Battery Management Systems. The standards development process is also discussed to provide insight into the global and North American landscape and how stakeholders can participate in the process and contribute to the development of new standards.

TS11.3 100% “EV READY” RESIDENTIAL PARKING REQUIREMENTS

Presenter(s): Brendan McEwen, AES Engineering, Vancouver BC

Access to “at home” charging is critical to enabling households to adopt EVs. To avoid costly, complicated retrofits, parking spaces in new buildings (most importantly multi-family apartments) can be made “EV Ready”.

Beginning with the Cities of Richmond and Vancouver, at least 14 municipalities in British Columbia have required that either 100% of residential parking, or at least 1 parking stall per dwelling unit, feature an energized electrical outlet capable of Level 2 charging. These requirements now cover the large majority of new residential development in the province of BC. The requirements have proven successful at enabling EV Ready new construction, and are recognized as an international best practice.

This presentation will review BC local governments’ EV Ready requirements, and outline considerations and best practices to support other local governments across Canada in adopting similar requirements. It will also provide an update regarding efforts to have EV Ready requirements established in Canada’s national model codes. And it will suggest opportunities for provinces to implement EV Ready requirements and/or best enable local requirements.

TS11.4 CURBSIDE EV CHARGING SOLUTION USING STREETLIGHT INFRASTRUCTURE

Presenter(s): Clay Howey, British Columbia Institute of Technology, Burnaby BC

While it is highly recommended that owners of EVs charge at home, not all can do so. Some single detached homes do not have off-street parking, and these “Garage Orphans” must park on the street. Charging EVs at the curbside is problematic as extension cords introduce tripping hazards, and trenching under sidewalks is impractical.

This paper explores an innovative curbside charging solution for Garage Orphans, using existing streetlight infrastructure, in conjunction with Electric Vehicle Energy Management Systems (EVEMS). With municipalities across Canada in the process of retrofitting streetlights from older technology to newer, more energy efficient LED fixtures, electrical capacity is freed that can be used to provision Level 2 EV chargers at the curbside. Further, an EVEMS can be used to monitor electrical consumption on the streetlight circuit, actively manage EV charging sessions to ensure safety, and maximize efficiency of the circuit.

BCIT, with support from Natural Resources Canada, demonstrated this concept the City of New Westminster. This paper discusses the project in detail, with emphasis on codes and standards work on EVEMS technology.

TS11.5 ELECTRICAL VEHICLE INFRASTRUCTURE TRAINING PROGRAM

Presenter(s): Neil Normandeau, Electrical Joint Training Committee, Port Coquitlam BC

The Electrical Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program (EVITP) is designed to train red seal electricians the proper industry-accepted methods of installing Electrical Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) based on the Canadian Electrical Code. Our presentation would highlight the importance of this program, current contractors in BC, who are certified by EVITP and our partnership with the government of BC, Fortis, and BC Hydro in order to roll the program across the province.

10:00 – 11:30

TS12 – How are businesses, utilities and technology providers preparing for this deployment?

Taking e-mobility Further: The Application of New Technology

Moderator:
Alexandre Lalonde
Product Manager, ABB Inc.

TS12.1 TYING TOGETHER EDEPOT AND ENERGY MANAGEMENT

Presenter(s): Anders Thulin, Siemens eMobility, Wendell NC, USA

The electric bus depot of the future will be made up of several hardware elements i.e. power distribution systems, the charging infrastructure itself and Distributed Energy Systems. Furthermore, the future depot will be connected to several different data streams, some internal to the depot i.e. charger data, energy system data, depot operations and some external i.e. energy markets, city data. Modern software-based solutions exist to marry the complexity and demands of depot’s with energy availability/cost aspects to drive positive outcomes.

TS12.2 SHIFTING VALUE POOLS IN AUTOMOTIVE SUPPLY CHAIN DRIVEN BY E-MOBILITY

Presenter(s): Rahul Gangal, Roland Berger, Toronto ON

An irrefutable and near term trend emerges from the disruption of e-mobility: the need for manufacturers to revamp the product portfolio. It is also evident that this wave of e-mobility will foster the emergence of a significant number of new players, both as OEMs and as suppliers. Less understood is the way e-mobility will cause a redo of the extremely well-set automotive supply chains. These traditional supply chains have evolved into tiered global plays with defined roles and business models for each type of player. Our research suggests completely new ways in which the automotive industry will need to organize itself to meet the e-mobility challenge. Such an impending restructuring and reorganization is expected to shift hundreds of billions of dollar value add and change the automotive landscape. This paper will explore this emerging evolution.

TS12.3 THE (BUSINESS) CASE FOR EV’s: HOW UTILITIES CAN JUSTIFY SIGNIFICANT INVESTMENT IN EV PROGRAMS

Presenter(s):Ahmed Hanafy, Dunsky Energy Consulting, Montreal QC

The forecasted growth in EV uptake presents electric utilities with both significant opportunities for new revenue streams, as well as risks arising from load impacts that may require substantial investments in infrastructure. Based on our work with utilities across North America assessing the potential for EV uptake in their service territories and developing strategies to maximize both utility and ratepayer benefits, we will share concrete results from these case studies to highlight:

  • Forecasted EV adoption under a range of scenarios that demonstrate the degree to which utilities can accelerate EV adoption through various types of investment, such as incentives and charging infrastructure deployment.,
  • Impacts of load growth from EVs under these scenarios, and how load management strategies can be implemented to mitigate peak load impacts.
  • Costs and benefits of potential interventions to utilities and ratepayers.

While market and regulatory contexts differ, we have consistently found that utilities are often in a unique position to significantly grow EV adoption. With careful planning, that growth can benefit ratepayers, generating a positive business case for regulatory approval of new utility investments.

11:30 – 13:00

Luncheon

13:00 – 14:30

PANEL #2

GRAYDON BALLROOM


eMobility: The potential for jobs in Canada

As Canada transitions to eMobility options in various parts of its transportation system, industrial adjustments will occur with positive impacts in some sectors and negative impacts in others.  Some jobs are at risk and new jobs are being created. The panelists representing industry and labour will share their views on this important question.

Moderator:  Neetika Sathe, Vice President, Alectra, Guelph ON 

Speakers:

  • Dr. Atif Kubursi, Professor Emeritus of Economics, McMaster University, President of Econometric Research, Former Undersecretary of The United Nations, Hamilton ON 
  • Repurposing the GM Oshawa Plant for EV assembly – Russ Christianson, Rhythm Communications, Campbellford ON

14:30 – 15:00

NETWORKING BREAK

Graydon Ballroom

presented by Hydro-Québec

15:00 – 16:30

TS13 – E-Mobility from an energy & environmental perspective: Emissions, environmental impacts, economics

Research and Innovation: Pre-commercial Technologies

Moderator:
Serge Carignan
Technical Director, Association du transport urbain du Québec

TS13.1 QUANTIFYING THE VALUE OF EV LEAD MANAGEMENT

Presenter(s): Mike Shin, Fleet Carma, a division of Geotab, Kitchener ON

There are multiple components electric utilities need to understand in order to quantify the value of EV load management. Some of the basic components of this analysis, such as the average charging load per EV (kW) and the coincident charging factor (%) has been difficult for utilities to identify due to the lack of baseline data. FleetCarma, through its experience working with electric utilities across North America took a first attempt to quantify the value of EV load.

In this presentation, we will walk the audience through FleetCarma’s internal analysis on the value of EV load management. Comparisons of average charging load, coincident charging factor, and future forecast will be drawn from FleetCarma’s large EV data set. By the end, audience should have a clearer understanding of the average EV charging load, coincident charging factor, and ways to identify ways to utilize this information in their utility cost-benefit analysis.

TS13.2 ELECTRIFICATION FEASIBILITY STUDIES FOR MEDIUM AND HEAVY-DUTY VEHICLE SEGMENT

Presenter(s): Yinghai Wu, Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa ON

Medium- and heavy-duty (MD/HD) vehicles are responsible for an increasing proportion of total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the transportation sector. In addition, most conventional MD/HD vehicles use diesel engines that also emit high levels of Criteria Air Contaminants that cause health problems.

Despite its growing share of GHG emissions, no clear technology solution has emerged to decarbonize the MD/HD segment, because this segment is very diverse with many different vehicle types and applications. Therefore, a more detailed evaluation of GHG emission reduction options per use case was conducted for city buses, coach buses, long-haul trucks and garbage trucks. Battery electric or hydrogen fuel cell alternatives were evaluated based on practicality, economics and GHG emission reduction in comparison to the conventional diesel drive trains. The objective of this study was to identify the preferred clean alternatives for the different use cases.

TS13.3 LIFE CYCLE GHG ANALYSIS OF ELECTRIC VEHICLES – A PROVINCIAL LEVEL COMPARISON

Presenter(s): Farid Bensebaa, National Research Council, Ottawa ON

Vehicle electrification is also a key measure in reducing GHG emissions in Canada under the Pan-Canadian framework to tackle climate change. Electric vehicles (EVs) have obvious advantages in energy savings in terms of efficiency and emission reductions during use (tail pipe emission reductions). However, emissions can also be generated during other stages of the lifecycle including vehicle and battery production and end-of-life, as well as during electricity generation. Life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology was used to evaluate overall GHG impacts.

The analysis showed that EVs have higher manufacturing emissions than conventional vehicles (CVs). However, the operation of an EV using clean electricity sources produces very low emission, allowing CV emissions to exceed EV emissions at point of vehicle operational mileage. Analysis considering 50,000, 150,000 and 250,000 km vehicle mileage revealed that electric vehicles contribute to GHG reductions starting from approximately 50,000 km operational mileage in provinces with cleaner electricity grid. On the other hand, provinces with high emission intensity (EI) electric grids did not show GHG reductions compared to conventional vehicles. The analysis also showed that future electric grid EI reductions o high EI provinces could lead to GHG reductions through vehicle electrification.

TS13.4 SYSTEMS APPROACHES TO QUANTIFYING THE GREENHOUSE GAS AND AIR QUALITY BENEFITS OF ELECTRIC VEHICLES LOCALLY AND GLOBALLY

Presenter(s): Daniel Posen, University of Toronto, Toronto ON

The transportation sector is a leading contributor to both greenhouse gas emissions and criteria air contaminants in Canada and around the world. With no tailpipe emissions, electric vehicles have the potential to reduce these emissions, bringing substantial health and climate benefits to society.

Realistic quantification of these benefits requires the adoption of a systems-level approach, combining life cycle assessment (i.e., considering full supply chain emissions) with modeling of the electric grid, local air quality and health impacts, vehicle fleet turnover, and more. This presentation will highlight some of the recent and ongoing work within my research group at University of Toronto. In particular, the talk will focus on:

The air quality benefits of EVs likely exceed even the climate benefits. Simulating an overnight change to either 25% or 100% electric vehicles in the GTHA, we found monetized annual health and climate benefits up to $3.9 Billion. Net benefits are observed even under a worst-case assumption that power will be provided entirely from fossil fuel (natural gas) plants.

15:00 – 16:30

TS14 – User-centric: Understanding what EV users and potential purchasers want and do

Policies and Programs: Accelerating Adoption

Moderator:
Nicole Morter
Grid Innovation Manager, Enmax

TS14.1 CANADA’S PUBLIC CHARGING INFRASTRUCTURE – HOW IS IT BEING USED AND WHAT CAN WE LEARN FORM IT?

Presenter(s): Simon Ouellette, Mogile Technologies, Montréal QC

In 2019 Mogile Technologies launched the new ChargeHub Central platform. This new platform can connect to all willing charging station operators and site hosts in Canada to generate key insight on how the local, regional and national fleet of charging stations are being used. This centralized knowledge can, in turn, inform better EV charging station operation practices and optimize the planning of future infrastructure deployment at the local, regional and national levels.

In this presentation, usage insight gained across thousands of public charging stations operated by multiple EV networks will be presented. Delegates will learn about similarities and differences in charging behavior in different regions of the country. Results presented provide invaluable insight to anyone currently operating EVSE, those planning the deployment of EVSE (ex: incentive programs), and utilities who have to power these EVSE. This presentation is being done in partnership with the B.C. Ministry of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources, Hydro-Québec, and B.C. Hydro.

(Note: The creation of the ChargeHub Central platform project has been made possible through funding from NRCan EVID)

TS14.2 UNDERSTANDING THE CONSUMER “SENSE OF URGENCY” TO ACQUIRE AN ELECTRIC VEHICLE: WHAT ARE THE INFLUENTIAL FACTORS?

Presenter(s): Mark Ferguson, McMaster Institute for Transportation and Logistics, Hamilton ON

Warnings from the scientific community on the impacts of climate change have become increasingly dire. It appears that massive action will be required to avoid the most serious negative impacts in upcoming decades. Certainly the decarbonization of transportation has a significant role to play in addressing this situation. Many would agree that the current situation is one of extreme urgency. However, at the level of the individual household, a sense of urgency on the issue is often not expressed and even if it is, it may not have been acted upon. Using data collected from an extensive 2018 national sample of Canadian households and appropriate multivariate analytics, this presentation will attempt to characterize and identify some of the main ingredients (perceptions, attitudes, contexts and otherwise) that are linked to the stated urgency to acquire a household electric vehicle. The presentation will seek to offer, if possible, some prescriptions that may achieve leverage in motivating higher levels of urgency to adopt in Canada and elsewhere.

TS14.3 FULLY CHARGED, FULLY UNDERSTOOD? QUANTIFYING EV CHARGING PATTERNS

Presenter(s): Gretchen A. Macht, University of Rhode Island, Kingston RI, USA

EVs are projected to make up 52% of all vehicles on the road by 2030, representing approximately 17% of global EV sales. With this significant, sustained demand on infrastructure, it is vital to understand how people charge their EVs. The literature utilizes a “one size fits all” approach within their decision-making computational or simulation models in order to calculate the new charging station locations to support the electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) infrastructure. None of these models, however, take into account human variability in driving or charging use, user-experience, and even distribution comprehensiveness; thus, directly impacting the accurate predictability of energy demand, infrastructure, and ubiquitous adoption required to support e-mobility. Based on our applications of the Misra-Gries “Heavy Hitters” and t-SNE algorithms, along with the Deadline Rush Model, we have found that unique patterns do exist per charging station, based on location and community type, and per person. Exploring and classifying these patterns is vital to understanding the entire distribution of charging infrastructure to ensure a user-centered decision-making approach.

TS14.4 WHAT'S CANADA SAYING? LISTENING TO CONSUMERS FOR THE BREAKTHROUGHS NEEDED IN ELECTRIC AND NEW MOBILITY

Presenter(s): James Carter, Principal Consultant, Vision Mobility, Toronto ON

The recent fourth annual Global Mobility Study, jointly produced by Vision Mobility, CuriosityCX and LEK Consulting, found that Canadian are among the most interested in the world in purchasing an electric or hybrid vehicle. However, there’s several barriers that still exist to full scale EV roll out from a consumer perspective. We also take a look at consumer interest in ownership, shared mobility (such as car sharing and e-scooters) and autonomous vehicles, and point to some future barriers and opportunity as we move towards entering New Mobility; and try to encapsulate what this might all mean in the long run.

From there we can make policy deductions and recommendations for both OEMs and those in the EVSE industry to move forward to ensure that Electric Vehicle adoption occurs as fast a possible.

TS14.5 EV PURCHASE INCENTIVES: DATA AND LESSONS FROM FOUR U.S. STATEWIDE PROGRAMS

Presenter(s): Brett Williams, PhD, Center for Sustainable Energy, San Diego CA, USA

Reducing the price of electric vehicles (EVs) has been identified as one of the most effective ways to accelerate adoption, but concerns surround the investment of public funds. How can nations, regions, utilities, and others best design impactful policies and programs? How do important but competing goals–market acceleration, cost-effectiveness, and equity–affect program design and evaluation?

This presentation draws upon data collected from four U.S. statewide programs (California, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and New York) that represent unique combinations of rebate-design features, challenges, and opportunities. Over 70,000 survey responses weighted to represent over 300,000 rebated EV consumers will be utilized to highlight: 1) consumer characteristics, 2) market and emission impacts, 3) eligibility criteria, and 4) dealer participation in point-of-sale purchase rebates and dealer-sales incentives.

Additionally, strategic market segments will be described that help EV markets grow beyond early adopters into mainstream consumers and beyond to priority populations.

15:00 – 16:30

TS15 – Cities and utilities – Innovators from across Canada discuss their successes and lessons learned

Policies and Programs: Accelerating Adoption

Moderator:
Ted Dowling
Vice President, BYD 

TS15.1 ACCELERATING THE TRANSITION: THE CITY OF TORONTO’S STRATEGY TO SUPPORT PASSENGER VEHICLE ELECTRIFICATION

Presenter(s): Raegan Bond, Dunsky Energy Consulting, Toronto ON

The City of Toronto, through its TransformTO initiative, is committed to reducing Green House Gas (GHG) emissions by 100% by 2050. The ultimate objective is creating a low-carbon future that is healthy, equitable, and prosperous. With passenger vehicles accounting for 30% of the City’s GHG emissions in 2017, transportation must transition towards low-carbon energy.

To support this transition, the City embarked on a journey to create its Electric Vehicle (EV) Strategy, which was finalized in the Fall of 2019. This presentation will share:

  • The strategy development process, including the key considerations and stakeholder engagement activities pursued; and
  • The 10 resulting actions, targeting activities which range from improving charging availability to increasing awareness of the social, environmental and economic impacts of EVs.

Attendees of this session will learn how Canada’s largest city plans to support the EV transition, and will gain a greater understanding of the opportunities and challenges associated with EV adoption in urban environments.

TS15.2 THE CITY OF KINGSTON'S EV STRATEGY 2017-2020 - CATALYZING LOCAL ADOPTION

Presenter(s): Paul MacLatchy, City of Kingston, Kingston ON

In 2017 the City of Kingston adopted their first EV strategy. Designed to accelerate adoption of EVs within the community and the municipal fleet, Kingston’s EV strategy took an aggressive approach to providing public EV charging infrastructure, increasing local EV awareness and replacement of municipal light and heavy duty fleets to EV. With almost two years of progress Kingston has seen a tripling of local EV registrations, a consistently increasing rise in EV charging, and the incorporation of over 15 light and heavy duty EVs into the municipal fleet. Progress was made even in the face of the same challenges as many early EV adopters including the removal of all provincial level EV subsidies, shortages of available EV units and the complexity of providing electrical servicing within urban street environments. Partnering with local and national NGOs has allowed Kingston to provide effective information to drivers and business owners on the benefits of EVs to operating cost levels and carbon footprints. The outlook for EVs in Kingston continues to look bright with plan ahead to increase the number of Kingston Transit buses that are fully electric and appearance of private sector charging infrastructure.

TS15.3 VELO-TRANSIT (E-BIKE COMMUTING) ACTIVE TRANSPORT CORPORATION

Presenter(s): Jean-Marc Blais, Velotransit, Carignan QC

Vélo-Transit innove avec une nouvelle société de transport combinant à la fois le vélo à assistance électrique (VAÉ), le transport collectif, des stationnements sécurisés intelligents en partage, des outils de mesures intelligents aux fins de gestion de trafic et de calculs d’économies diverses.

Financés par l’entreprise privée et ses travailleurs, les programmes Vélo-Transit offrent aux grandes municipalités une nouvelle option pour réduire le trafic*, aux villes médianes des services modulables de transport actif en partage et privé, et aux entreprises, des réseaux de transports privés pour leurs employés.

*(Selon nos études, le VAÉ à Montréal a un potentiel de 83 000 usagés et réduirait de 50 000 voitures sur nos routes quotidiennement … de quoi rendre 830,000 Montréalais plus heureux et moins stressés)

TS15.4 BRITISH COLUMBIA’S EXPERIENCE DEPLOYING AND MAINTAINING DCFC NETWORKS – FROM THE SUPPORTING CAST

Presenter(s): Kevin Cheong, Powertech Labs Inc., Surrey BC

As the testing/research/development subsidiary of BC Hydro, Powertech has been supporting the deployment, operation and maintenance of BC Hydro’s network of DC Fast Chargers for the past few years. We also support other networks in other parts of the country. We have made many adjustments over time, worked with several charger manufacturers, models of chargers, network vendors, contractors, other equipment suppliers, and service providers, etc. As is often the case what appears to be the obvious approach sometimes doesn’t turn out to be the best solution. Understanding the relevant issues, and anticipating the problems allows for proactively avoiding those problems. We will discuss some of the issues we recommend others avoid, from the perspective of electrical engineers with substantial design and construction, and now maintenance management, experience.

TS15.5 MANAGED SMART CHARGING AT WORKPLACE

Presenter(s): Fahimeh Kazempour, Alectra Utilities, Vaughan ON

Alectra Utilities has launched a pilot program entitled Alectra Drive for the Workplace to demonstrate the value of managed smart charging. The program uses a Distributed Energy Resource Management System to manage charging events in a holistic manner that balances EV charging load with building loads and other distributed energy resources like battery storage and solar generation.

The approach is designed to provide multiple benefits to the host facility and to the utility: to reduce electricity costs by minimizing EV charging’s contribution to the building’s peak demand and scheduling charging for when energy prices are lower; to protect electrical infrastructure by avoid overloading local electrical capacity; and to provide an accessible EV charging solution that meets drivers’ needs.

The presentation will provide preliminary results on energy impacts and customer feedback to provide insight into how managed smart charging can be deployed at a broader scale in the future.

18:00 – 21:00

Cocktail Award Reception

Graydon Ballroom

presented by Chargepoint

EV2020VÉ Conference & Trade Show
April 27-30, 2020 | Hilton Mississauga, Ontario CANADA
Electric Mobility Canada (EMC) invites you to the 11th annual national event. Focusing on all modes of ground electric transportation, the EV/VÉ Conference and Trade Show is the most important and respected event in the EV industry in Canada.

Organised by

Electric Mobility Canada

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