APRIL 27-30, 2020

HILTON MISSISSAUGA, ONTARIO

APRIL 27-30, 2020 - HILTON MISSISSAUGA, ONTARIO

7:00 – 8:00

Continental Breakfast

Graydon Ballroom

8:00 – 18:00

TRADE SHOW

Graydon Foyer and McCallion A-B

8:00 – 9:30

OPENING PLENARY

GRAYDON BALLROOM


Senior government and industry officials will set the tone for the conference by emphasizing the importance of sustainable transportation and how they see eMobility shape our transportation future. 

Moderator: Conference Chair Catherine Kargas, Marcon, Montreal QC

Speakers: 

  • Neetika Sathe, Vice President, GRE&T Centre, Alectra, Guelph ON 
  • Christina Ianniciello, Director, Clean Transportation Branch, Ministry of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources, Government of British Columbia, Victoria BC
  • Theresa Dekker, Vice President, Corporate Business Development & Strategy, Ontario Power Generation, Toronto ON
  • Louis Tremblay, AddĖnergie Technologies/Flo, Québec QC
  • Dan Guatto, Chair Electric Mobility Canada and Chief Operating Officer, Burlington Hydro, Burlington ON

9:30 – 10:00

NETWORKING BREAK

10:00 – 11:30

TS1 – Battery Technologies: What is the latest research in new battery chemistry, design, safety, and recycling?

Research and Innovation: Pre-commercial Technologies

Moderator:
Amin Ghazanfari
Research Engineer, Hydro-Québec

TS1.1 SEIZING OPPORTUNITIES FOR CANADA IN THE GLOBAL BATTERY VALUE CHAIN

Presenter(s): Malika Nanduri Bhatt, Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa ON

The Government conducted a series of stakeholder engagements to understand how Canada can realize emerging opportunities in the global battery value chain and how to position Canada as a globally competitive player in this space.
On electrification, Canada has a natural advantage; over 80% of our electricity comes from non-emitting sources but only 20% of our energy end-uses are electric.

Canada is well positioned to establish itself as a hub for battery production given our known deposits and untapped mineral potential. We can also boast a world-leading battery research community; an established automotive industry that is well-integrated with the American market and abundant renewable and affordable energy. These advantages, coupled with the commitment to be net-zero by 2050, make it critical that federal leadership together with close cooperation with provincial and territorial governments create an environment that gives industry leaders (foreign and domestic ones) the confidence that Canada is the best place to invest in and develop batteries.

This presentation will elaborate on the findings to date and on our path forward as we act on recommendations made through a variety of ways, including policies, programs, and most importantly, partnerships with provinces, territories and industry stakeholders.

TS1.2 CREATING A SECONDARY SOURCE FOR CRITICAL BATTERY MATERIALS

Presenter(s): Tim Johnston, Li-Cycle Corp. Mississauga ON

This presentation will explore the need for ‘mega’ scale lithium-ion battery resource recovery globally, the challenges of lithium-ion (Li-ion) recycling and how Li-Cycle™ is able to overcome these challenges to recover 80 – 100% of critical materials from Li-ion batteries.
Li-ion batteries play an essential role in the global transition toward electrification. According to BNEF’s recent study, worldwide electric vehicle sales will rise from 2 million in 2018 to 56 million by 2040, which accumulated 559 million electric vehicles will be on the road worldwide.

However, the world has lacked a viable option for dealing with the rapidly growing volumes of spent lithium-ion batteries in conjunction with a projected gap in the supply of critical materials such as nickel, cobalt, and lithium. Li-Cycle™ provides a solution for this gap through an innovative and sustainable resource recovery process.

Li-Cycle Corp, (Li-Cycle™) is a clean technology company aiming to address this challenge and support the industry to meet the rapidly growing demand for critical battery materials. Being one of few companies focused on recycling Li-ion batteries, Li-Cycle™ has a unique insight into the challenges and opportunities of the industry, as well as the necessity for proper end-of-life logistics management.

TS1.3 OPTIONS AND POLICIES FOR EFFECTIVE ELECTRIC VEHICLE BATTERY RECYCLING

Presenter(s): Alexandre Beaudet, InnovĖĖ, Montreal QC

The need for cost-effective, energy-efficient strategies for treating end-of-life electric vehicle (EV) batteries is becoming increasingly urgent. Re-purposing used EV batteries for so-called second-life applications (such as energy storage) is one option, but ultimately solutions for recycling battery materials will be needed, as is currently done with used lead-acid batteries. In Quebec, research and pilot projects on lithium-ion battery recycling, involving stakeholders such as Hydro-Quebec, Lithion Recycling, CNETE, University of Montreal, and Nemaska Lithium Inc. (among others), show promising results. Drawing on existing literature as well as results from research and pilot projects currently underway in Quebec, this paper reviews (i) key economic, environmental and policy drivers for recycling EV batteries, (ii) the main recycling process options currently under consideration, and (iii) technical and financial challenges to scaling up recycling infrastructure. The paper proposes a number of policies and strategies for overcoming these challenges, such as increasing funding for pilot projects (particularly those contributing to fostering collaboration along the entire recycling value chain), and programs to accelerate both incremental innovation and technological breakthroughs on recycling technology.

TS1.4 NICKEL RICH CATHODE MATERIALS

Presenter(s): Michael Wang, Springpower International Inc, Mississauga ON

Nickel rich cathode materials now are dominating the EV battery applications. Conventional technology for making the precursor materials generates effluent during the production process. It is environmentally extensive and the treatment of effluent is expensive which is believed to be the barrier to build cathode materials production in North America.

Springpower proposes proprietary effluent-free technology for making the materials. The invented technology is environmentally friendly and lowers the production cost by removing the effluent treatment plant. The performance of the final products is on par with that produced by conventional technology.

Springpower is piloting the technology at Mississauga and moving to build a 10,000 metric ton production in Canada. The existence of cathode material production in North America is strategically important.

TS1.5 BATTERY PERFORMANCE IN THE REAL WORLD

Presenter(s): Charlotte Argue, Geotab, Vancouver BC

The answer to how quickly electric car batteries degrade remains ambiguous, for there has been very little information covering how batteries have performed in real use cases across a large sample of vehicles, or over a significant period of time. To shed some light on this topic, Geotab has analyzed over 6,000 electric cars representing 1.8 million days of data, comparing the state of health for 21 unique vehicle models. We also offer insights into how real-world conditions have influenced the battery health of vehicles looking at different factors known to increase battery stress, such as use, climate and predominant charging type.

10:00 – 11:30

TS2 – Policies and programs to accelerate the environmental and economic benefits of EVs and EV production in Canada?

Policies and Programs: Accelerating Adoption

Moderator:
Daniel Breton
Director, Ėlectrification des transports

TS2.1 100% OF SALES BY 2030: CONCEIVABLE, OR PIPE DREAM?

Presenter(s): Philippe Dunsky, Dunsky Energy Consulting, Montreal QC

Worldwide, a handful of countries have adopted goals to ensure that 100% of new vehicle sales are electric by a date certain – typically ranging between 2030 and 2040. But how realistic is that for Canada and its provinces?

Based on his firm’s most recent EV forecasts, conducted for governments and utilities across Canada, Dunsky will discuss:

  • The speed at which market demand can be expected to grow
  • The impact that policy levers – including incentives, investments in public charging infrastructure, universal charging access requirements, and ZEV mandates – can have on accelerating that demand, and
  • The feasibility of achieving 100% by 2030.

Chair of the Quebec government’s Electrification Working Group, Mr. Dunsky will also discuss the government’s new Electrification and Climate Change Plan, assuming it is published prior to the conference. The plan is slated to put electrification at the center of its efforts to slash carbon emissions in the coming decade.

TS2.2 FORECASTING THE ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF ELECTRIC VEHICLE ADOPTION IN CANADA

Presenter(s): Brianne Riehl, Navius Research, Vancouver BC

Navius is working with the International Council on Clean Transportation and the Pembina Institute to forecast the economic impacts of EV adoption in Canada. This project is using Navius’ gTech model to explore how current and potential new EV-supportive policies may drive EV adoption and domestic vehicle manufacturing activity in the decades to come. The forecasts account for key dynamics that influence EV adoption, including (1) technological change (i.e., the extent to which EV cost and performance improves), (2) consumer preferences and how they may shift over time, and (3) the full range of EV-supportive policies already implemented across the country, from federal and provincial purchase rebates to the ZEV mandates of Québec and BC. The forecasting will then go further and assess the impact of stronger Canadian EV policies across two dimensions: (1) support for the adoption of EVs and (2) support for Canadian EV manufacturing. A wide range of metrics, from EV adoption rates across multiple vehicle classes to manufacturing GDP and jobs, will enable us to identify insights for policy makers seeking to accelerate an EV transition in Canada.

TS2.3 POWER PLAY: CANADA’S ROLE IN THE ELECTRIC VEHICLE TRANSITION

Presenter(s): Ben Sharpe, International Council on Clean Transportation, San Francisco CA, USA

Canada holds a prominent stake in the global automotive industry, but that position could be strengthened with stronger action to support the transition to electric vehicles. Canada’s auto industry lags other auto-manufacturing countries in its preparation for an electric future. Canada’s global 2018 position for light-duty vehicle production is 12th, having fallen from its position as the 5th largest automaker in 2000. Production facilities in Ontario by Chrysler, Ford, General Motors, and Toyota are dominated by conventional combustion vehicles, while these companies are making billion-dollar electric vehicle investments elsewhere—especially in China, Europe, and the United States. There are many ways for Canada to re-invest in the auto industry to position it for the future. Beyond market-demand policies to ensure affordable models and convenient charging, supply-side policies like research and development, loan guarantees, and tax breaks for manufacturing plant are warranted. Canada will also be well served to leverage its strategic advantages in hydrogen and fuel cell technology, which are likely to be especially important to electrification efforts for larger and longer-distance vehicles such as heavy-duty freight trucks.

TS2.4 A JURISDICTIONAL REVIEW OF EFFECTIVE PROGRAMS AND POLICIES AND TO ACCELERATE EV ADOPTION

Presenter(s): Joshua Ulliac, ICF, Calgary AB

A review of electric vehicle (EV) programs and policies in key North American and Canadian markets has provided insights into the initiatives with the potential to accelerate EV adoption. This paper reviews varying municipal, Provincial, and Federal policy approaches that have been undertaken in early EV markets (e.g. Norway, California, Colorado, BC, Ontario and Quebec) and identifies those that have been successful. These approaches include establishing pricing mechanisms to equalize upfront capital expenditures for EVs, improving access to EV charging, and updating the building and parking requirements. These policies reduce the cost differential for EVs compared to ICE vehicles, ensure that EV owners can readily access charging infrastructure and support development of new EV charging infrastructure in residential and workplace buildings. This review analyzes and highlights the most effective and robust mechanisms utilized around the world for accelerating EV adoption. It is aimed at supporting Canadian cities to develop, modify, or implement their own EV strategies to ensure a proactive and holistic response enhances EV adoption and e-mobility objectives.

TS2.5 ELECTRICITY PRICING TO INFLUENCE ELECTRIC VEHICLE CHARGING BEHAVIOUR BY RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS

Presenter(s): Daniel Carr, Alectra Utilities, Vaughan ON

Electric vehicle charging takes place predominantly in the residential context and this trend is likely to persist for the foreseeable future. While the convenience and cost benefits of charging at home are clear for EV drivers, utilities recognize that these new loads represent both a challenge and an opportunity; EV charging can create strain on local electricity distribution infrastructure due to their significant power draw, while at the same time increasing utilization of the system and creating a demand for other energy and mobility services. To provide customers with an attractive value proposition while also mitigating the need for investment in new infrastructure, Alectra Utilities has developed several programs to encourage residential customers to charge their EVs during off-peak times. Beginning with its Advantage Power Pricing electricity pricing pilot, which featured rates with low off-peak and super-low overnight rates, Alectra has now developed Alectra Drive @ Home, which uses both price and non-price tools to test the effectiveness of various strategies in influencing customer behaviour. Final results from the Advantage Power Pricing study and the design features and initial findings of the Alectra Drive @ Home programs will be presented.

10:00 – 11:30

TS3 – What are the applications of new technology? How is e-mobility re-shaping the world of mining, commercial and recreational vehicles and public transit?

Taking e-mobility Further: The Application of New Technology

Moderator:
Adam Halsey
Senior Advisor, Ontario Power Generation

TS3.1 FORECASTING THE ADOPTION OF MEDIUM AND HEAVY DUTY EVS IN CANADA

Presenter(s): Jeff Turner, Dunsky Energy Consulting, Montreal QC

In order to inform future policy and program development, Natural Resources Canada commissioned Dunsky Energy Consulting to develop forecasts for the potential adoption of electric medium- and heavy-duty vehicles (MHDV) in Canada. Dunsky used its EVA forecasting model to segment the MHDV fleet into 9 segments, such as transit buses, refuse trucks, and long-haul freight trucks. Dunsky conducted extensive research to populate the model with key inputs for each vehicle type, including:

  • The incremental purchase cost of an electric vehicle in each segment, and how this cost is expected to evolve over time.
  • The typical usage profile of each segment, and the potential efficiency improvement of switching to an EV for that specific usage profile.
  • Other considerations relating to charging infrastructure and range requirements.

By assessing these factors for each of the 9 vehicle segments, Dunsky developed forecasts for the potential EV market share in each segment. These results can help policy makers by identifying the most promising near-term opportunities while flagging challenges that will benefit from further research and development.

TS3.2 BRIDGING EMOBILITY AND ENERGY: DEPOT OF THE FUTURE

Presenter(s): Theresa Cooke Siemens, Norcross GA, USA

With transportation electrification, the needs of vehicles and electric grids converge. The electric depot plays a pivotal role to enable both efficient electrification of public transit systems and reliable integration with electric utilities. With the improvement of autonomous technology, the optimization of depots is even more important and offers opportunities for deeper integration of different systems. This paper evaluates the current state of available technology in charging and grid integration holistically, and based on current implementations. This paper will then provide an outlook on the depot of the future as well as recommendations on the evolution of standards and necessary technological developments including V2G, parallel charging, in-depot pantograph and inductive charging.

TS3.3 STUDY OF FEASIBILITY OF CANADIAN PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION FLEET TRANSITIONING TO 100% ZERO EMISSION BUSES

Presenter(s): Dr. Josipa Petrunic, Canadian Urban Transit Research & Innovation Consortium (CUTRIC), Toronto ON

Due to the increase in climate change awareness, it is crucial for the public and municipal transport fleet to transition to a zero-emission fleet. This means the introduction of Battery Electric Buses (BEBs) and Fuel Cell Electric Buses (FCEBs) into the existing transit fleet in-order to achieve zero-emission fleet targets within the next 15 years. In California, there is already a huge push for all transit agencies to be 100% Zero-Emission Bus (ZEB) by 2040. It is not so far away that such strict regulations might be imposed for the Canadian Transit Agencies. In order to achieve this, transit agencies have to plan way ahead of time in terms of garage location and infrastructure, purchasing of new ZEBs, in-depot and on-route charging, utility charges and dealing with high power demand peaks, bus scheduling, route analysis and charging time optimization. In order to help transit agencies, plan in the right path, a multi-physics modelling tool has been developed and deployed using route parameters and the currently available electric buses in the market to estimate and predict the feasibility of ZEBs on given routes in a transit network. The outcomes of this study will be presented in the oral presentation.

TS3.4 OPG'S ELECTRIC SCHOOL BUS V2X PILOT

Presenter(s): Ian Chow, Ontario Power Generation, Toronto ON

Ontario Power Generation’s (OPG) innovative electric school bus V2X pilot replaces diesel-fuelled school buses with non-emitting buses powered by Ontario’s clean electricity, while demonstrating their ability to provide V2X grid services. During the school year, electric school buses will be used as transportation for students, which reduces carbon emissions and negative health outcomes associated with diesel exhaust. When the buses are not being used for transportation, they will be used for grid services, which provide savings to customers and reduces carbon emissions from the grid. This demonstration represents an innovative application of V2X technology that takes advantage of the natural fit between school bus utilization schedules and the seasonal needs of Ontario’s electricity system to create a win-win situation for bus operators and electricity customers.

TS3.5 COMMERCIALIZATION OF V2G TECHNOLOGY IN ONTARIO

Presenter(s): Kathleen Kauth, Peak Power Inc, Toronto ON

In 2019, Peak Power launched the “Peak Drive” project in the heart of downtown Toronto with the objective of commercializing V2G technology, and gauging consumer appetite for allowing their car to be used as a grid resource and means of driving electricity cost savings. Furthermore, this project pushes the boundaries of V2G, leveraging Peak’s predictive market optimization software to discharge the EVs at a rate of 30kW to target the most expensive hours of peak demand, not unlike many stationary energy storage projects currently deployed in Ontario. This project is the first phase in the deployment of one of the world’s largest transactive energy projects in Toronto that aims to unlock electricity market revenue streams for electric vehicle owners, ultimately reducing cost of ownership and incentivizing EV use through market-based mechanisms.

11:30 – 13:00

Luncheon

13:00 – 14:30

PANEL #1

GRAYDON BALLROOM


eMobility beyond light duty vehicles

The EV industry is hard at work delivering on eMobility options beyond light duty vehicles and this panel will share insights into recent developments and future offerings for users of trucks and buses.

Moderator: Pierre Ducharme, President, Marcon, Montreal QC

Speakers: 

  • Sylvain Castonguay, Nordresa / Dana, Laval QC
  • Jonathan Polak, BYD Trucks, Newmarket ON
  • Stephane Gagné, Ovation Logistics, Sherbrooke QC

14:30 – 15:00

NETWORKING BREAK

15:00 – 16:15

TS4 – Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles: Hydrogen storage, fuel cell industrialization, system costs

Research and Innovation: Pre-commercial Technologies

Moderator:
Stephen Koskoletos
Manager, Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure – Canada, ABB Inc.

TS4.1 QUALITY CONTROL R & D IN SUPPORT TO FUEL CELL INDUSTRIALIZATION

Presenter(s): François Girard, National Research Council Canada, Vancouver BC

Building on over a decade of investment in hydrogen and fuel cell R&D, NRC has focused its effort on the research needs of the sector around manufacturing and industrialization of fuel cell technology in transport electrification through its Vehicle Propulsion Technologies program. Quality control is an essential component for cost reduction and reliability of the technology in addition to support the stimulation of the supply chain. This paper will present NRC’s activities in that area, including international mobilization, specifics projects and future plans.

TS4.2 HYDROGEN POWERED TRANSIT SOLUTIONS IN MISSISSAUGA – TECHNOLOGY HOMECOMING

Presenter(s): Aditya Ramesh, CUTRIC, Toronto ON

Hydrogen technology powered transit solutions are being adopted widely as viable, scalable and technologically sound emissions reduction modalities to address transportation needs and challenges on a global scale. Although Canadian hydrogen industry has a strong leadership in the worldwide hydrogen mobility sector, hydrogen technology uptake and adoption in the transit sector have not been happening in Canada for long. The Canadian Urban Transit Research & Innovation Consortium (CUTRIC) is leading Canada’s only hydrogen fuel cell electric bus project involving a long-term bipartite emission solution employing oxygen integration to reduce emissions from heavy emitting industries and hydrogen to replace fossil fuel powered vehicles. In the short term, this project would be leveraging green hydrogen generation opportunities provided by the Power-to-Gas facility in Markham and CUTRIC’s multi physics-based modelling and feasibility analysis prowess that has helped multiple innovative transit agencies choose the zero-emission solution that serves their economic, environmental, and technological interests in Canada and abroad to deploy and demonstrate the operation of hydrogen fuel cell electric buses in Mississauga.

TS4.3 ZERO-EMISSION FREIGHT TRANSPORT IS NEARER THAN YOU THINK

Presenter(s): Sean Mackinnon, Loop Energy, Burnaby BC

Short-haul stop-and-go delivery of containerized goods in North America is integral to the economy represents approximately one third of North America’s transport pollution. The current challenge is to introduce a comprehensive solution that can reduce or eliminate freight emissions while not disrupting the movement of goods and, if possible, improve the economics of freight delivery.

Electrification of light-duty automotive continues to experience healthy debate regarding picking winners – battery or fuel cell. Heavy-duty freight transport presents unique challenges as on-board energy storage must be sufficient to alleviate range anxiety while timely fuel/energy replenishment cannot hinder delivery of goods. Simply adding more battery storage to achieve desired range increases gross vehicle weight and recharging time, making it an challenging option as a comprehensive heavy-duty vehicle solution. While opportunity charging battery electric vehicles is a potential option for some applications, fuel cell electric vehicles is a comprehensive solution.

Loop Energy’s fuel cell stack technology in a hydrogen fuel cell range extender as the opportunity to match the performance and economics of diesel-powered trucks, but with zero emissions. The presentation will outline Loop Energy’s technology solution for medium and heavy-duty transportation.

15:00 – 16:15

TS5 – Where are we now? Canadian policy update

Policies and Programs: Accelerating Adoption

Moderator:
Mitchell Armstrong
Project Engineer, Environment and Climate Change Canada

TS5.1 CANADIAN EV CHARGING POLICY UPDATE [PART 1]

Presenter(s): Suzanne Goldberg, ChargePoint, Vancouver BC

Canada is experiencing an exciting transformation with record sales of electric vehicles (EV) and accelerated growth in deployment of EV charging capabilities in a number of provinces across the country. Widespread adoption has been driven in part by policy. This presentation will provide updates on some of the most important policies influencing EV charging in Canada including: (1) the federal Clean Fuel Standard, a major Canadian policy intended to support clean fuels, including electricity; (2) federal policies supporting transit and fleets; (3) utility commission EV-related activity across Canada; (4) updates on British Columbia’s “right-to-charge policy,” and (5) the Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) supply program. This presentation will address how the federal Clean Fuel Standard will help accelerate electrification and support the business case for fleet and workplace electrification investments. It will also identify how the outcome of the utility commission activity and fleet policy will impact investments in charging infrastructure.

TS5.2 CANADIAN EV CHARGING POLICY UPDATE [PART 2]

Presenter(s): Travis Allan, FLO, Québec QC

The last year has had no shortage of important policy developments related to electrified transportation in Canada. This presentation will provide updates on some of the most important including: (1) the federal Clean Fuel Standard, a major Canadian policy intended to support clean fuels, including electricity, (2) the BC Low Carbon Fuel Standard, (3) utility commission EV-related activity across Canada (especially in BC and Alberta), (4) updates on BC’s “right to charge”, and perennial favourite (5) ZEV supply policy.

TS5.3 QUÉBEC’S ZERO-EMISSION VEHICLE STANDARD: REVIEW OF THE FIRST PERIOD OF COMPLIANCE

Presenter(s): Marilou Gosselin, Ministère de l’Environnement et de la Lutte contre les changements climatiques, Québec QC

The zero-emission vehicle (ZEV) standard, aimed to spur the supply of a greater number and a wider range of electric vehicles to Québec consumers, came into force on January 18, 2018. The required reporting by vehicle manufacturers for the first regulatory compliance period, encompassing 2014 to 2018 model year vehicles, was required by September 1, 2019. The automotive industry took up the challenge, and all manufacturers have met their obligations.

The communication will highlight the first compliance period’s balance sheet, including the vehicles deemed eligible for credits, the number and types of vehicles reported, the credits accumulated by the car industry, as well as credit transactions between manufacturers. The operational issues encountered during the implementation of the ZEV Standard will also be discussed, as well as the solutions provided.

TS5.4 POLICY LEVERS AND IMPACTS IN EV ADOPTION IN BRITISH COLUMBIA

Presenter(s): Neil MacEachern, PlugIn BC (Fraser Basin Council), Vancouver BC

Since 2012, British Columbia has had policies in place to encourage the uptake of electric vehicles in the province. From modest success in early phases, programs have evolved in the province to better address the barriers to EV adoption, including a public knowledge gap, dearth of charging infrastructure, vehicle price, and lack of availability. Programs to counter these include the Emotive public outreach program, Multi-unit residential building and workplace charging incentives, vehicle point of sale rebates, and a Zero emission vehicle mandate. Local municipalities in over half the province have also adopted zoning regulations to require EV charging infrastructure in new construction. These policies, involving multiple partners (including the Fraser Basin Council), alongside market developments, have resulted in a massive increased in new EV uptake, reaching the highest adoption rate in North America.

15:00 – 16:15

TS6 – How are commercial fleet managers applying this technology and how is the total cost of ownership driving adoption?

Taking E-mobility Further: The Application of New Technology

Moderator:
Adam Hasley
Senior Advisor, Ontario Power Generation

TS6.1 DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A REAL-LIFE PEAK SHAVING CHARGE MANAGER FOR AN ELECTRIC SCHOOL BUS FLEET

Presenter(s): Guillaume Fournier, Innovative Vehicle Institute, Saint-Jérôme QC

In this paper, the author presents the steps taken to design and implement an intelligent cloud-based manager whose goal is to charge a fleet of electric school buses optimally to reduce power peaks on the grid. The manager uses a 24-hour building power profile estimate with weather compensation from the utility company as well as the instantaneous power reading from the meter to control the current limit assigned to the electric school buses (up to 80A) through slightly modified level 2 EVSEs. The fleet operator also uses a web-based scheduling interface to enter the different bus routes into to the system. Finally, the buses are connected to the cloud using a cellular modem so relevant information such as SOC and power transferred to the battery can be shared with the manager. The manager is operational and currently being tested in Canada’s cold climate.

TS6.2 CITY OF ABBOTSFORD, BC, LARGE HEAVY-DUTY FLEET SMART CHARGING INFRASTRUCTURE – A USE CASE

Presenter(s): Matthieu Loos, Picea Hoa Technologies Ltd, Vancouver BC

Trucks are now being delivered to customers for pilot projects. While those projects will demonstrate the vehicle performances, it won’t demonstrate the challenges a full fleet electrification requires.

To fully electrifying an heavy-duty fleet, it is critical to understand the specifics of the business operation. Utilization, routes, periodicity and economic growth need to be accounted for to select the right technologies based on accurate life cycle cost analysis. For example, if the vehicles have a regular schedule, the charging time can be predicted however the demand can be significant and therefore requires a smart charging strategy. If trucks are on stand-by, like snow-plowers, predictive charging or fast charging may be required.

This presentation will detail the work performed for a municipality in BC willing to convert their entire fleet (130+ vehicles) over a 10 years period. To drive an economical transition, a smart charging strategy was developed integrating DCFCs, overnight L2 charging, renewable energy and stationary battery storage. A roadmap was developed to both minimize capital expenditure for the infrastructure and the operating cost of the 130+ chargers.

TS6.3 CASE STUDY: IMPLEMENTATION OF ELECTRIC TRUCKS IN AN URBAN HOME DELIVERY SERVICE

Presenter(s): Stéphane Gagné, Ovation Logistics, Sherbrooke QC , Canada

Ovation Logistics, the leading supplier of end-to-end heavy goods home delivery solutions, with operations across Canada, has taken an important step in providing environmentally-responsible delivery services to its retail partners. Ovation has long been committed to zero landfill on packaging, to the recycling of used electronics and appliances as well as to route optimization to minimize GHG emissions. The company now embarks on the next phase of its environmentally-responsible offering with the ZERO-EMISSION DELIVERY SOLUTION. This program will deploy battery-electric trucks throughout the Ovation Logistics network.

In collaboration with Brault & Martineau (B&M), Ovation was the first to launch shift to zero-emission trucks in the home delivery of large items segment. Since November 2019, two all-electric class 5 trucks supplied by Nordresa have been used to deliver furniture and appliances to B&M’s customers.

Ovation’s CEO, Stéphane Gagné, will deliver a hands-on case study of what it takes to adopt electric trucks in a real-life environment. He will describe the challlenges and experiences of ncorporating electric trucks into a delivery fleet from sourcing vehicles and charging stations to daily operation.

TS6.4 ACCELERATING THE SHIFT TO FLEET E-MOBILITY: REDUCING THE COST OF OPERATION

Presenter(s): David Peterson, Chargepoint, Campbell CA, USA

Currently, fleets are accelerating the shift to e-mobility at a rapid rate. From small cities to large retail giants to shared ride services, a growing number of cities as well as private and public organizations have ambitious electrification commitments. For example, Loblaws, one of Canada’s largest grocery retailers, has committed to completely electrifying its fleet as part of its greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction commitments. British Columbia (BC) Transit has committed to purchasing only e-buses beginning in 2023. While the driving force behind some of these commitments are environmental, fleets are discovering that they can achieve significant operational cost savings (between 50 and 60 percent) and paybacks within the range of 3 to 10 years. This presentation will draw on the growing experience of ChargePoint assisting several fleets with the transition to electric. It will cover key considerations for fleet, in terms of optimizing charging infrastructure design to minimize the capital and operational costs of electric fueling, thereby improving both the payback and total cost of ownership following fleet electrification.

16:30 – 17:45

TS7 – Smart mobility and storage: What is the latest research in smart charging, ultra-fast charging, V2X?

Research and Innovation: Pre-commercial Technologies

Moderator:
Amin Ghazanfari
Research Engineer, Hydro-Québec

TS7.1 URBAN LOGISTICS INFRASTRUCTURE – SUSTAINABLE AND EFFICIENT

Presenter(s): Klaus Kerth, Kiepe Electric GmbH, Düsseldorf, Germany

In Motion Charging (IMC) provides an efficient solution for the electrification of public transport. All other means of charging on the spot have their potential limits, as electrical energy transfer takes approximately 100 times longer than chemical energy transfer.
Stationary charging involves the necessity to stop the vehicle while being charged, which means that the operator is losing time, thus money during forced operational breaks. Moreover, it may result in the increase of vehicles necessary to operate the route.
The type of charging mode has a fundamental impact on the battery cycle. Dynamic charging allows to limit the amount of energy, because the length of the section covered in battery mode is shorter.
As the overnight charging seems most suitable for small fleets of standard buses with a moderate daily mileage, the principle of opportunity charging seems more adequate to overcome the limits of range by recharging during revenue operation. This also reduces the required infrastructure peak power for charging a larger fleet during the night.
The innovative In Motion Charging concept is quite comparable to opportunity charging: The higher the charging power, the shorter the charging time.

TS7.2 WHY SMART CHARGING IS CRITICAL FOR ELECTRIC VEHICLES

Presenter(s): Elise Benoit, Enel X, San Carlos CA, USA

There are currently 6 million EVs on the road worldwide with this number projected to reach over 400 million by 2040. As EV adoption continues to rise, EVs will increasingly contribute to peak energy demand and introduce new challenges to the grid. Left unmanaged, the resulting increase in peak demand will require significant grid upgrades, particularly on the distribution grid, once EV fleet grows beyond 10%. However, smart grid EV charging, V1G, or managed charging, can provide a range of grid services through intelligent modulation of unidirectional energy flows from the grid to the vehicle, such as real-time grid balancing, reducing energy costs, integrating intermittent renewable energy, reducing air pollutants and deferring expensive infrastructure upgrades. By shifting charging based on grid conditions, smart charging can effectively reduce peak load by over 50% and reduce necessary grid upgrades by 30-70% while allowing drivers to charge cleaner and cheaper, according to BNEF.

Enel X is the only charging provider to successfully deploy a 40MW “virtual battery” in CA, and with over 80,000 smart charging stations in over 20 countries, is actively proving how dynamic the future of electrification can be.

TS7.3 USING A BLOCKCHAIN TO MITIGATE TRUST IN ELECTRIC VEHICLE CHARGING

Presenter(s): Carter Li, SWTCH Energy Inc, Toronto ON

Energy systems are rapidly becoming decentralized due to advances in distributed renewable generation, storage technologies, and electric vehicles (EVs). One consequence of decentralization is the loss of a central trusted party. There is, therefore, a need for a solution that enables interactions between mutually untrusting agents. We present a general methodology for blockchain-oriented system design and demonstrate its use to design a system for EV charging and energy management in a decentralized network, We also present how a blockchain can be integrated with existing building energy management systems with minimal changes to a legacy back end.

TS7.4 EVE ENERGY MANAGEMENT: TALES FROM THE TRENCHES

Presenter(s): Kelly Carmichael, BCIT, Burnaby BC

Energy Managed EV charging is all the rage these days, CSA is working on testing standards to certify products, several vendors have products on the market that are capable of doing several styles of energy management that fit a variety of applications, and new products are being developed. These systems impact many aspects to the EV charging ecosystem.

This paper explores different EVEMS enabled systems that have been installed and tested by BCIT as part of their electric vehicle infrastructure research projects. We will describe the technologies, where the systems work well, where we have had challenges, and we will walk the audience through our successes and the issues we experienced, and what we have done to address them.

16:30 – 17:45

TS8 – Rural electrification: It’s not just cities

Policies and Programs: Accelerating Adoption

Moderator:
Sanjeev Pushkarna
Manager, Nova Scotia Power

TS8.1 PREPARING TRUCK COUNTRY FOR THE EV-REVOLUTION

Presenter(s): Megan Lohmann, Community Energy Association, Fernie BC

An innovative collaboration between economic development organizations, municipalities, governments and the private sector transformed a rural region of Alberta into one fully connected for electric vehicle travel, effectively quadrupling fast charging options in the province. We can learn from this initiative that leveraging the expertise of diverse partners and framing the transition to EVs in a way that emphasizes local values and context can stimulate EV adoption even in “truck country”. The experience of Peaks To Prairies, and of its partners – including ATCO, Alberta SouthWest Regional Alliance, SouthGrow Regional Initiative, The City of Calgary and FLO – can be replicated across the country. By prioritizing economic development, tourism and support for the local renewable energy sector, the project, and its deployment of 20 DC Fast Chargers across rural Alberta, has ignited an appreciation for the opportunities presented by EVs. And while the project will accelerate EV adoption in rural areas, it will also spur adoption in urban centres like Calgary, providing city residents with charging options to travel where they want rather than where they must – to the USA, BC and beyond.

TS8.2 ELECTRIFYING THE EAST COAST: HOW THE TIDES HAVE TURNED IN NOVA SCOTIA

Presenter(s): Jérémie Bernardin, Clean Foundation, Dartmouth NS

For over a decade, Nova Scotia has been a leader in reducing carbon emissions, especially in the electricity generation and building sectors. With transportation being the second-largest source of emissions in Nova Scotia, the provincial government has turned its focus to reducing GHGs associated with this sector. One pillar of the province’s approach is increasing the number of Nova Scotians driving EVs. The Next Ride program launched in summer 2019 with the goal of increasing Nova Scotians’ awareness of EVs and providing them with opportunities to experience EVs first-hand through test drives. As of November 2019, the Next Ride program has visited 26 communities, spoken with over 4719 Nova Scotians at 69 events, and taken 1183 people for test drives. Our experience has shown that in provinces with EV supply issues such as Nova Scotia, consumer awareness is very low, but the engagement strategy deployed by Next Ride has been successful in addressing this barrier.

TS8.3 - CAN ELECTRIC VEHICULES HELP ADDRESS THE URBAN - RURAL DIVIDE?

Presenter(s): Tyler Seed, Ontario Power Generation, Toronto ON

To date, adoption in cities has rapidly outpaced rural areas, but could the EV revolution also help address Canada’s growing urban rural divide? Forward thinking communities increasingly view EV charging as an essential pillar of local tourism programs, and key to first-mile-last-mile regional transit connections. While some leading regions are investing in charging infrastructure in advance of existing local demand, new offerings and programs are needed to help smaller communities pool resources and expertise. This presentation will share lessons from electrification projects in rural communities across Canada, and especially from Ontario Power Generation’s work to build charging in rural Ontario.

TS8.4 -THE ALBERTA STORY – INNOVATION AND COLLABORATION – ACCELERATE EV ADOPTION

Presenter(s): Nicole Morter, ENMAX Power Corporation, Calgary AB

Alberta’s list of EV adoption challenges are expanding beyond cost and lack of EV model diversity. Factors such as large rural regions, dispersed populations, extreme weather and limited provincial support all contribute to slower adoption of EVs. That said, Alberta has much to contribute to the conversation of how private and public entities can leverage customer interest to lay a strong foundation for future growth of e-mobility. Alberta’s residents, municipalities, economic regions and local businesses have shown great interest in e-mobility, and innovation focused organizations have demonstrated leadership in transforming this latent support. ATCO, Community Energy Association and ENMAX will speak about the programs they developed to support the needs of these different customer groups to drive higher EV adoption, despite the barriers. Both the Peaks to Prairies EV charging network and the Charge Up pilot are successful examples of forward-thinking initiatives that have resulted in enthusiasm for e-mobility and demonstrated the great potential for accelerated EV adoption in Alberta. This panel will offer a unique perspective for conference participants to learn how diverse partners have created opportunity and found value despite slow rates of EV adoption.
Proposed as a panel discussion or combined presentation.

16:30 – 17:45

TS9 – What role are businesses, site hosts, utilities, charging network operators, OEMs, landlords, condo corporations and technology providers playing in the deployment of EVs and the rollout of a charging infrastructure?

Taking e-mobility Further: The Application of New Technology

Moderator:
Simon Ouellette
CEO & Co-founder, Mogile Technologies Inc.

TS9.1 REQUIREMENTS FOR MASS-ADOPTION OF ZERO-EMISSION VEHICLES

Presenter(s): Don Romano, Hyundai Auto Canada Corp., Markham ON

Consumer demand for zero-emission vehicles is on the rise, but concerns such as range anxiety and accessible charging infrastructure create barriers to mass-adoption. Electric vehicles have continuously been improved to offer extensive range, but a lack of adequate charging infrastructure remains a major issue for prospective buyers. Regulations to support this much-needed infrastructure development are also limited.

Hyundai has always been a leader in sustainable transportation, offering vehicles with four electrified power-trains including hydrogen fuel cell. Demand has been exceptionally high with the company selling these vehicles as soon as they hit dealerships, and in many cases, even before. Hyundai strongly believes that hydrogen is the most promising type of alternative power train in existence today, and was the first to make a hydrogen fuel cell-powered vehicle available to Canadians. Don is an avid supporter of vehicle electrification and can speak to topics including Hyundai’s leadership in the field, the future of zero-emission vehicles, importance of government rebates and mandates in promoting mass-adoption of EVs, and a variety of other related subjects. We are also open to discussing other topics that would be a fit for the conference, and happy to provide any additional information or materials.

TS9.2 SAME GOAL, DIFFERENT COMPANIES: HYDRO ONE AND OPG'S PARTNERSHIP ON EV FAST CHARGING NETWORK

Presenter(s): Abdullah Rehan, Ivy Charging Network, Toronto ON

As two of Ontario’s largest electricity utility companies with a common goal of spurring EV adoption, Hydro One and OPG are connecting Ontario’s rural communities with urban centers via an unregulated charging network that spans the entire province. As the EV market expands, a wide variety of stakeholders, including auto manufacturers, utilities, communities, businesses, and other site hosts have crucial roles to play for providing an enhanced charging experience to EV drivers. In our journey of bringing a customer focused, fast charging network to life, we have had the opportunity to collaborate with many of these stakeholders in order to plan a reliable network that alleviates range anxiety, offer a high quality charging experience in partnership with strategic site hosts and expedite EV uptake through channel partnerships with key players of the EV industry. We will share lessons on respective roles and value-creation opportunities suited to different stakeholders, and reflect on future collaborative opportunities in order to successfully rollout and operate Ontario’s farthest reaching fast charging network.

TS9.3 ACHIEVING A SEAMLESS DRIVER EXPERIENCE THROUGH EV CHARGER INTEROPERABILITY

Presenter(s): Hamid Atighechi, Powertech Labs, Vancouver BC

With a growing number of cards, apps, accounts and charger types, the EV charging landscape can be confusing and frustrating for drivers. A number of charging networks have acknowledged the problem and developed “roaming agreements”, allowing drivers to use a card or app from one network to activate a charger on another network. While roaming represents a step forward, agreements do not exist between all charging networks. Furthermore, roaming does not necessarily address overall usability of different charger types.

The BC Hydro EV Network incorporates several innovations that take interoperability to the next level. Using “design thinking” concepts, BC Hydro has developed an improved customer journey from the site layout, lighting and signage to the app, card and website. Also, by working closely with a number of partners, BC Hydro has implemented technical innovations that create a seamless charging experience across 4 different brands of EV charger. These concepts can be replicated by utilities and other network operators throughout North America.

TS9.4 OPG’S ROLE IN THE DEPLOYMENT OF TRANSIT ELECTRIFICATION

Presenter(s): Adam Halsey, Ontario Power Generation, Toronto ON

As transportation accounts for up to 38% of Canadian CO2 emissions, transit authorities are preparing to electrify their fleets in response to an ever growing demand to decarbonize. This dramatic shift from fossil fuel to electric infrastructure will require the engagement and participation of many key stakeholders, including utilities. As such, OPG is taking a proactive lead by developing and driving industry uptake in Ontario. Our presentation will share best practices, lessons learned, and how OPG is influencing the transit electrification value chain via technical, financial, and operational innovation.

TS9.5 DEPLOYING EV CHARGING NETWORKS IN LARGE ORGANIZATIONS (ACCELERATING ADOPTION THROUGH COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT)

Presenter(s): Igor Sataric and Foued Barouni, AddÉnergie / FLO, Québec City QC

When a sustainability-focused organization develops an electric vehicle (EV) charging network, it sends an unequivocal message that EVs are a viable option, and it helps link their brand to cleaner air and lower greenhouse gas emissions. Today, more and more large organizations are deploying EV charging infrastructure to encourage customers and employees to embrace the transition towards zero-emission transportation.

Leading organizations hoping to offer charging stations face a number of questions and challenges. This presentation will address each one based on real-world experience working with some of North America’s leading companies.

First, a large-scale project requires funding and active involvement and sponsorship from the C-Suite and the operational level.

Second, once an organization obtains buy-in from all major stakeholders, project definition (timeline and budget) becomes critical for successful implementation.

Finally, project scope, definition of deliverables and the selection of a future-proofed solution is important to help optimize the initial investment in the infrastructure are avoid problems with future expansion of the project as more customers and/or employees adopt EVs.

In addition to direct purchase of stations, companies may be interested in innovative “Infrastructure as a Service” models that provides turnkey vetting and selection of contractors, approval and control of suppliers, as well as providing a solution that reduces up-front cost of infrastructure implementation and ensures scalability over time.

Our presentation will be supported with a case study analysis of a large Credit Union where an Infrastructure as a Service approach was implemented, resulting in an EV charging infrastructure that lowers CAPEX, optimizes OPEX, while minimizing risks associated with deployment and operations.

The case study will also discuss how a service level agreement (SLA) can maximize uptime, provide first class EV charging experience and provide administrative simplicity via a single point of contact for operation and support.

18:00 – 21:00

Networking Evening at Chop

presented by FLO

EV2020VÉ Conference & Trade Show
April 27-30, 2020 | Hilton Mississauga, Ontario CANADA
Electric Mobility Canada (EMC) invites you to the 11th annual national event. Focusing on all modes of ground electric transportation, the EV/VÉ Conference and Trade Show is the most important and respected event in the EV industry in Canada.

Organised by

Electric Mobility Canada

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