May 6 to 9, 2019

Hôtel Le Concorde, Quebec City, QC

7:30 – 8:30

Continental Breakfast

08:30 – 10:00

Opening Plenary


 

Éric Martel, President and Chief Executive Officer, Hydro-Québec

Mr. Éric Martel is President and Chief Executive Officer of Hydro-Québec, a position he held since July 6, 2015. Before joining Hydro-Québec in July 2015, he held a number of management positions at Bombardier from 2002 to 2015, including President of the Avions d’affaires and Services à la clientèle divisions.

Éric Martel holds a Bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from Laval University and is a member of the Ordre des ingénieurs du Québec. He sits on the board of the Global Sustainable Energy Partnership and chairs the Programme Committee of the World Energy Council. He also serves as Chair of the Electricity Industry Community of the World Economic Forum (WEF) and as a member of the Stewardship Board of the WEF’s System Initiative on Shaping the Energy of the Future.

Louis Tremblay, President and Chief Executive Officer, FLO

Louis Tremblay is President and CEO of AddEnergie and its subsidiary company FLO. A pioneer in the field of electric mobility in Canada, he cofounded AddEnergie in 2009 while he was still a student at Laval University (Quebec). Over the years, Mr. Tremblay established himself as an influential and respected figure in the electric vehicle (EV) industry, as he guided his company to become a North American leader in EV charging solutions and the operator of Canada’s largest charging network. Today, he leads an organization that employs more than 150 people in 7 business places. Louis Tremblay graduated from Laval University with a Bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering and pursued graduate-level studies in Power Electronics. He is Chairman of the Board of Propulsion Québec, Quebec’s Industrial Cluster for Electric and Smart Transportation, and a member of the Generation Energy Council, a 14-member committee set up by Natural Resources Canada to provide recommendations on how Canada can transition to a reliable, affordable, low-carbon economy in the future.

Mohamed Mezghani, Secretary General, Union Internationale des Transports Publics (UITP)

Mohamed Mezghani is the Secretary General of the International Association of Public Transport (UITP) since January 1st, 2018. He has been working for more than 25 years in public transport and urban mobility related fields.

He has a degree in Industrial Engineering from Ecole Nationale d’Ingénieurs de Tunis, Tunisia, and a Master in Transport from Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussées, Paris, France.

10:00 – 10:30

Networking break

10:30 – 12:00

TS1. TRANSIT #1 

Smart cities

Moderator :
  Mohamed Mezghani
Secretary General
Union Internationale des Transports Publics (UITP)

TS1.1 THE ROLE OF FEASIBILITY STUDIES IN THE PLANNING OF SMART VEHICLE DEPLOYMENTS FOR TRANSIT APPLICATIONS

Presenter(s): Kristina Mlakar, CUTRIC, Toronto ON

The Canadian Urban Transit Research & Innovation Consortium (CUTRIC) has been leading the development of the National Smart Vehicle Demonstration and Integration Trial which strives to improve mobility options for Canadians by driving forward the deployment of transit integrated low-speed electrified autonomous connected shuttles (eLSAs) as first-mile/last-mile solutions.  The goal of this project is to help innovative transit systems across Canada to be more dynamic and more responsive to commuter and rider needs. It is also to support the jobs rich growth of an innovation eco-system across the country in the design of technologically advanced electrification, sensory, communications and cybersecurity tools that support low-speed electrified autonomous shuttles. To support the planning of Phase I, a simulation tool was developed in-house to predict the electricity usage of e-LSAs for 12 jurisdictions across Canada. The main outcomes of this feasibility study will be presented during this talk.

TS1.2 A FIRST 100% ELECTRIC BUS ROUTE IN LAVAL IN 2020

Presenter(s): Pierre Lavigueur,  Société de transport de Laval, Laval QC

In 2017, the Société de transport de Laval (STL) announced its intentions to purchase 10 all-electric buses and operate the first electric bus route in Laval in 2020. The contract was awarded to New Flyer in the summer 2018, which is expected to deliver the first bus in the summer 2019. This presentation will discuss the challenges encountered and what will need to be in place to operate the bus route by the end of 2020. We will address vehicle characteristics, charging technologies, fleet power management systems, and the necessary modifications on our current installations in order to operate the electric bus line in 2020. 

TS1.3 DEVELOPING A LOW CARBON FLEET STRATEGY FOR THE FUTURE

Presenter(s): Dom Repta, TransLink, Vancouver BC

Metro Vancouver’s Transit Authority, TransLink, is currently developing a Low Carbon Fleet Strategy outlining a roadmap for greenhouse gas reduction of TransLink’s 1,500 buses, while still meeting service demands of the region. Lessons learned, opportunities, challenges and potential solutions related to electrification of a full fleet through battery-bus technology and renewable fuel options will be the focus of the presentation.

TS1.4 IN-DEPOT OPPORTUNITY CHARGING - AN INNOVATIVE, NEW APPROACH TO FLEET ELECTRIFICATION

Presenter(s): Paul Netzband, Edmonton Transit and Transit Fleet Maintenance, Edmonton AB

The City of Edmonton has undertaken an innovative, progressive program for the electrification of its transit fleet. Numerous challenges have been overcome that required new technologies, high-degree of internal and external stakeholder collaboration, new open standards, future-proofing and a holistic, enterprise project delivery approach. In this session, the City of Edmonton will discuss how these challenges have been addressed in its Electric Bus Program to electrify the transit bus fleet. In-depth information will be presented on utility demand loads/peak shaving, grid power limitations and energy storage subsystems (ESS), facility infrastructure design, new in-depot opportunity charging model, negotiated procurement, vehicle and charging systems engineering and charging operations simulation. We’ll also review potential business impacts to City functions requiring changes to business process, maintenance/servicing, retooling and labor strategy. An integrated, Cloud-based Energy Management and Charger Control software application, and the data integration to existing transit applications is presented. Finally, how the City influenced SAE J3105-1 Recommended Practice to enable electrification and design trade-offs are also discussed.

The City of Edmonton is currently in year three (3) of this five (5) year program and will share lessons learned with the industry.

10:30 – 12:00

TS2. SMART CHARGING

Technology & Innovation

Moderator :
 Alexandre Lalonde
 Product Manager, Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure 
ABB

TS2.1 POTENTIAL OF MACHINE LEARNING FOR SMART CHARGING

Presenter(s): Matthieu Loos, Powertech Labs, Surrey, BC

Recent statistics show that electrification of transport is growing and accelerating. If left unmanaged, the demand of this new load is going to increase the electricity demand on the distribution network. According to recent data collected by Powertech Labs for a BC Hydro Smart Charging Demonstration program, most of the electric vehicle drivers plug around the same time (after work) which coincide with the already existing peak demand in the distribution transformer. However, the amount of energy those drivers required is only two to three hours of charge with a regular level 2 charger while the vehicle stays plugged in for more than 8 hours. Smart chargers are a practical and easy way to help utilities control a very flexible load. This program demonstrated that smart charging programs can improve distribution asset utilization and therefore improve the power grid economics while keeping the customer happy. Multiple control methods have been tested. Later on, machine learning tests have been performed to identify the potential of a large scale smart charging deployment.

TS2.2 ATCO HOME SMART CHARGING

Presenter(s): François Blouin, ATCO, Calgary AB

The project provides an EV charging station network and grid demand coordination platform focused on frequent, localized, simultaneous EV charging sessions representing collective and cumulative effects that manage peak demand and grid upgrade issues and costs; extend lifecycle and reduced utility asset cost, represent expanded cold weather access to EV charging and enhance energy literacy on the part of the building operator and EV driver.  The ATCO Home smart charging will become a distributed generation node, a prosumer “pico-grid”, in the electrical distribution network, importing and exporting electrical energy and regulating and shifting its own electrical demand, either on the owner’s instructions, through machine learning or on network demand. ATCO Home smart charging includes Solar PV, Energy storage and dispatchable EV charging station, all integrated and autonomously controlled.

TS2.3 SMARTCHARGE NEW YORK: SHIFTING EV CHARGING TO OFF-PEAK TIMES USING SMARTCHARGE REWARDS

Presenter(s): Eric Mallia, FleetCarma, A Geotab Company, Waterloo ON

SmartCharge New York is an innovative program managed by FleetCarma in partnership with New York City’s electric utility Con Edison. The program was designed to help EV drivers reduce the cost of charging and enhance electric grid efficiency and resiliency – making service more reliable for everyone.  Through FleetCarma’s unique interactive digital platform, EV Owners in the Con Edison Territory can track EV stats and automatically earn rewards each month when charging in the Con Edison service territory. They can earn additional rewards by shifting charging to off-peak hours and staying clear of summer peak hours.  This presentation will focus on the results of integrating EVs into the smart grid system using financial incentives to modify behaviour and extrapolate what it means for other electric utilities in the Canadian context.

TS2.4 MANAGED SMART CHARGING FOR WORKPLACES

Presenter(s):  Daniel Carr,  Alectra Utilities, Vaughan ON

Alectra Utilities has launched a pilot program entitled Alectra Drive for the Workplace to demonstrate the value of managed smart charging. The program uses a Distributed Energy Resource Management System to manage charging events in a holistic manner that balances EV charging load with building loads and other distributed energy resources like battery storage and solar generation. The approach is designed to provide multiple benefits to the host facility and to the utility: to reduce electricity costs by minimizing EV charging’s contribution to the building’s peak demand and scheduling charging for when energy prices are lower; to protect electrical infrastructure by avoid overloading local electrical capacity; and to provide an accessible EV charging solution that meets drivers’ needs.  The presentation will provide preliminary results on energy impacts and customer feedback to provide insight into how managed smart charging can be deployed at a broader scale in the future.

10:30 – 12:00

TS3. PROVINCIAL OUTLOOK

Consumers & Policies

Moderator :
Diane Robichaud
 E-Mobility Product Manager
NB Power

TS3.1 INFRASTRUCTURE ENABLING ADOPTION: EARLY UTILIZATION DATA FROM NOVA SCOTIA’S DCFC NETWORK

Presenter(s): Nathaniel Pearre, Dalhousie University, Halifax NS

The ability to charge EVs quickly on the road has long been considered a key driver of widespread adoption. Prior to 2018, the infrastructure necessary to do so in Nova Scotia was limited to a single corridor, not ideally located, and of poor reliability. That fact paired with a lack of purchase incentives led to minimal EV uptake, estimated at 100 vehicles as of early 2018. In June 2018, the electric utility Nova Scotia Power opened a network of DC Fast Chargers along the province’s 100-series highways, upping the number of such stations from two to 14. This research will examine the first 10 months of charging event data from the 12 new stations, and will characterize patterns of utilization across the province and through time as the network approaches its first year of operation. A response signal with new EV registrations in the province will also be sought to test the thesis that a well-designed network can spur EV adoption.

TS3.2 CHARGING AHEAD: BC'S COLLABORATION TO INCREASE EV OWNERSHIP

Presenter(s): Matthew Klippenstein, Plug In BC (Fraser Basin Council), Vancouver BC

BC’s EV share of the new vehicle market was 3.7% by September 2018, the highest in Canada. This is the story of the broad coalition that has laid the groundwork for BC’s EV success, bringing together the public sector, private sector, academia and civil society. This has been accomplished by:  1. tackling barriers such as charging access in residential buildings and workplaces, including leading the world in EV charging requirements for residential construction; 2. cost-effective outreach through the Emotive program; 3. systematic fleet electrification strategies; 4. partnerships with dealers to reduce costs for consumers; 5. utilities, local and provincial governments, and the private sector working together to deploy public infrastructure; and 6. training our growing ZEV and infrastructure workforce.  Private-sector innovation is necessary but alone cannot change consumers’ hearts and minds. Proactive policy, public sector support, solutions for condos and castles alike, and patient and persistent public outreach are also required. Presenters will share their experiences, and learn from the audience’s own insights.

TS3.3 THE IMPACT OF INCENTIVES FOR THE ACQUISITION OF ELECTRIC VEHICLES IN QUÉBEC

Presenter(s): Bernard Lamonde, Transition énergétique Québec, Québec QC

The increasing popularity of electric vehicles and the recent increase in sales resulting from this, well position Québec to reach the target of 100,000 electric vehicles on the road in 2020. The current measures of the government in terms of electrification of transport contribute substantially to this green shift. They make it possible to significantly reduce the greenhouse gas emissions of the transportation sector and support the sustainable development of the Québec economy. The Roulez vert program is the most important measure in place to facilitate the introduction of electric vehicles in Quebec. In addition to providing financial assistance for the purchase of new electric vehicles and charging stations, a new approach is also being tested to support the acquisition of used electric vehicles. This conference will draw a portrait of the impact of the measures under Transition énergétique Québec’s responsibility.

TS3.4 DEVELOPING EV ADOPTION FORECASTS IN THE ABSENCE OF GOVERNMENT EV TARGETS

Presenter(s): Nicole Morter, ENMAX Power Corporation, Calgary AB

This presentation tackles the issue of how utilities in provinces without EV targets create EV adoption forecasts and integrate those forecasts into their load forecasts and business cases. In provinces like BC and Ontario, utilities can use government EV targets for forecasting and planning, but Alberta has no EV targets. This is a challenge for Alberta utilities, who must develop their own EV adoption forecasts and be prepared to defend those forecasts to a regulator. In 2018, ENMAX worked with Dunsky consulting to develop an EV adoption forecast for Calgary.  That forecast is now being reviewed and refined from a legal and regulatory perspective, under the assumption it may have to be present to a regulator in the future. In this presentation we will share lessons learned from the forecasting process and the ways in which we used the forecast results to inform our business strategies.

12:00 – 13:00

Luncheon

13:00 – 14:30

Moderator :
Catherine Kargas
Electric Mobility Canada

Panel #1 – Mobility as a Service


Chris Schafer, Senior Director, Strategic Development, Lime

Chris is the Senior Director of Strategic Development in Canada with Lime. In his role, Chris focuses on government, media, and stakeholder relations. Before joining Lime, Chris was Uber Canada’s Senior Public Policy Manager. Chris has an Honours B.A. in political science from Wilfrid Laurier University, an M.A. in political science from the University of Western Ontario, and an L.L.B. from Osgoode Hall Law School.

Christian Savard, General Manager, Vivre en Ville

Christian Savard is the General Manager of Vivre en Ville since 2006. His work and involvement in the public debate led him to supervise the writing of many publications on sustainable mobility and urbanism. He is frequently called by different private, public and voluntary groups on a number of issues, and participates to different discussion committees and to the development of policies and programs.

He holds a Masters in Planning and Regional Development; he specialized in transport, urban planning and urban design, while developing an expertise in the management of NGOs.

Mohamed Mezghani, Secretary General, Union Internationale des Transports Publics (UITP)

Mohamed Mezghani is the Secretary General of the International Association of Public Transport (UITP) since January 1st, 2018. He has been working for more than 25 years in public transport and urban mobility related fields.

He has a degree in Industrial Engineering from Ecole Nationale d’Ingénieurs de Tunis, Tunisia, and a Master in Transport from Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussées, Paris, France.

Marco Viviani, Vice-President, strategic development, Communauto

Marco Viviani is the Vice-President, strategic development for Communauto, the oldest carsharing organization in North America and the largest in Canada, operating in 13 cities in Canada and France.

After his studies at the University of Milan (Italy), he assumed a leading position in environmental organizations at European level (World Wide Fund for nature, Eco-institute in Italy) in the field of energy efficiency and sustainable mobility. His involvement in carsharing started in 1997, with a first research on the subject, and became his focus when he joined Communauto in 2003. With Communauto he largely contributed to some of its recent accomplishments: the progressive electrification of the fleet, the integration with transit and other mobility services, the combination of the station-based and free-floating carsharing as well the international expansion of Communauto’s activities. He is one of the founders of the Carsharing Association.

14:30 – 15:00

Networking break

15:00 – 16:30

TS4. MUNICIPALITIES & EVS 

Smart cities

Moderator:
Michaël Houle
Manager, Quebec Office
ICLEI Canada

TS4.1 100% EV READY RESIDENCES - EV CHARGING INFRASTRUCTURE REQUIREMENTS LEADERSHIP IN THE GREATER VANCOUVER REGION

Presenter(s): Brendan McEwen, McEwen Climate and Energy, Vancouver BC

In 2017, the City of Richmond, BC, amended its Zoning Bylaw to require that all residential parking spaces in new developments feature an energized electrical outlet capable of providing Level 2 EV charging, the first such requirement in North America. The City of Vancouver and multiple other local governments in the region have since adopted similar bylaws, and this requirement now applies to the majority of new development in BC. Now, efforts are underway to support adoption of this policy in cities across Canada and around the world.   This session will cover the rationale for how “EV Ready” policies supports electric mobility; technologies that support EV charging in multifamily buildings; cost information; and the range of tools and resources available to inform cities and provinces as they adopt their own EV Ready requirements.

TS4.2 DEVELOPING A MUNICIPAL STRATEGY ON ELECTRIFICATION | A CASE STUDY

Presenter(s): Thierry St-Cyr, Institut du véhicule innovant (IVI), Saint-Jérôme QC

The Innovative Vehicle Institute (IVI) is a non-profit organization affiliated with the Cégep of Saint-Jérôme that supports businesses through applied research, development, assessment, and implementation of innovative technologies in the transport industry. Since 2018, the IVI provides advisory service (needs assessment, analysis, recommendations, training, implementation, and axis of communication) to cities and municipalities. This service hinges in 3 categories: – Municipal fleet electrification – Public and municipal charging infrastructure deployment – Municipal incentive development to accelerate transport electrification. This presentation will include a case study of Terrebonne, a municipality on the north shore of Montreal. We will discuss the main issues and realities we encountered, and some key findings.

TS4.3 IMPLEMENTATION OF MONTREAL'S ELECTRIFICATION STRATEGY - UPDATES AND CHALLENGES

Presenter(s): Guillaume Longchamps, Ville de Montréal, Montréal QC

In 2016, the City of Montreal adopted an electrification strategy to help citizens transitioning towards electric transport. Gathering the efforts of multiple municipal services, this strategy led to the implementation of various innovative projects. Three years later, the City is updating its strategy to adapt to the quick evolution of the transport electrification sector. This presentation will show the evolution of the charging station network and the efforts of the city administration to procure EVs and to modify its building installations accordingly. This presentation will review the strategy and announce the projects to come.

TS4.4 A FAST-CHARGING PARTNERSHIP FOR SMARTER, MORE SUSTAINABLE CITIES

Presenter(s): Thomas Ashley, Greenlots, Los Angeles CA

EVs have gone from novelty to global reality, heavily influencing smart cities’ transportation goals. Bloomberg New Energy Finance projects the sales of EVs to surge from 1.1 million in 2017 to 30 million in 2030 as they become cheaper to make than internal combustion engine cars.

EV growth comes with its share of challenges for smart cities – especially surrounding charging infrastructure. An overhaul of the way we travel necessitates a partnership among diverse stakeholders: municipalities, utilities, energy companies and automakers must work together to collectively address the entire EV charging ecosystem rather than its individual components in isolation. A smart charging network for EVs that is integrated with existing grids and uses open standards offers a solution that addresses the scale and complexity of this project in a way that simply installing new charging stations does not.

This presentation will discuss inclusive approaches to deploying large-scale EV charging infrastructure for smarter, more resilient cities. Attendees will gain knowledge of how to implement a multi-stakeholder approach to EV infrastructure deployment within their own communities. 

15:00 – 16:30

TS5. POWER MANAGEMENT

Technology & Innovation

Moderator:
France Lampron
 Director, Transportation Electrification
Hydro-Québec

TS5.1 INNOVATIONS IN CHARGING AND GRID MANAGEMENT

Presenter(s): Clay Collier, ChargePoint, Los Angeles CA, USA

Innovations in charging, grid management, the deployment of smart technology and better ways to monitor and manage all types of electric-powered fleets will completely disrupt traditional transportation. ChargePoint Energy Solutions (ES) team has developed specialized software technology to help support fleets across North America optimize charging and grid interactions. Initial application of this solution was applied to an innovative vehicle-to-grid deployment for the US Department of Defense and was used to manage fleet vehicle assignment; optimize charging schedules to provide sufficient charge at least cost; facilitate electricity trading, and support energy storage. This solution has also been used to optimize EV fleet operations and EV charging for Alameda County; reduce demand charges for DCFC with solar and battery storage; and optimize EV bus fleet charging for Santa Clara Valley Transit. This presentation will share insights from these projects and describe the methods developed to manage capacity and lower costs, and integrate with existing fleet operation applications.

TS5.2 POWER MANAGEMENT FOR EV FLEET CHARGING STATIONS

Presenter(s): François Marchand, Ministère du Transports – Centre de gestion de l’équipement roulant, Québec QC

The Centre de gestion de l’équipement roulant (CGER) boasts one of the largest EV fleets in North America. With the arrival of EVs, the CGER had to install multiple charging stations. Some of the charging sites used by the government of Quebec gather more than 10, 15, or even 20 charging stations. Based on the data collected at these locations in the last months, this presentation will focus on the impacts of controlling and managing power usage. The data will offer potential solutions to establish a balance between power management and charging vehicles in the allocated time.

TS5.3 VARIOUS APPROACHES OF POWER MANAGEMENT FOR EV CHARGING INFRASTRUCTURE

Presenter(s): Foued Barouni, AddÉnergie/FLO, Québec QC

The Electric Vehicle (EV) industry is experiencing significant growth and transformations. Some of these transformations are a higher EV battery capacity and a tremendous deployment of electric vehicle charging stations. Several Level II charging solutions have been developed over the past years to allow EV charging in various locations such as home, workplace, fleet, public locations (curbside and parking lots) to name a few. A successful EV charging infrastructure deployment goes beyond offering a charging experience. In this presentation we discuss how to manage peak load generated by charging stations in various applications. We present a centralized approach at the utility level which is applied to residential charging stations using demand response programs. For public charging applications such as fleet and workplace, we introduce a decentralized approach where technologies such as power sharing and power limiting will be used in order to allow scalability and effectiveness of the EV charging infrastructure.

TS5.4 VEHICLE TO GRID: LOOKING PAST THE HYPE

Presenter(s): Jeff Turner, Dunsky Energy Consulting, Montreal QC

Vehicle-Grid Integration (VGI) refers to a broad mix of technologies and strategies that minimize the impact of EVs on the grid and even derive benefits from their use as flexible distributed energy resources.  Smart charging is widely seen as the most promising VGI option, offering the best bang for the buck in terms of grid benefits without significant additional technology costs.  Vehicle-to-Grid (V2G) is a more advanced form of VGI that involves bi-directional energy transfer between EVs and the grid, effectively leveraging EVs as distributed storage resources. While V2G elicits more excitement and headlines than other VGI options, the technology and business models to support it are not as well understood. Through a variety of projects for electric utilities across Canada, Dunsky has looked past the V2G hype to determine when it might actually make sense to tap into EV batteries to support the grid. This presentation will include an overview of the most promising use cases and technology options to turn V2G into a reality, as well as some of the most important barriers.

15:00 – 16:30

TS6. FEDERAL INITIATIVES

Consumers & Policies

Moderator:
Eric Baril
 Director General
Automotive and Surface Transportation Research Centre, NRC

TS6.1 ADVANCEMENTS IN VEHICLE ELECTRIFICATION AT THE NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL (NRC) OF CANADA

Presenter(s): Eddy Zuppel, National Research Council Canada, Boucherville QC

In 2012 the NRC established a dedicated vehicle electrification strategy to support Canadian industry and other government departments in meeting emissions and fuel consumption targets by advancing the development of cost-competitive, reliable and safe technologies. The resulting Vehicle Propulsion Technologies (VPT) program has led and contributed to numerous collaborative projects related to electric motors, energy storage and fuel cell manufacturing.  Electric motor activities have focused on improving performance with alternative designs and reducing costs by using powder metallurgy and additive manufacturing approaches.  VPT has had a notable presence throughout the energy storage and fuel cell supply chain in particular with respect to the evolution of lithium-ion batteries. A wide range of material/component development, simulation and testing capabilities have benefited industrial products and governmental policies.  Future work related to solid-state batteries, battery recycling, alkaline fuel cells, and 3D printing of magnetic materials is currently under investigation.  In addition to an overview of the program, existing capabilities, significant achievements and future electrification activities will be covered in this presentation.

TS6.2 GOVERNMENT OF CANADA GREENING GOVERNMENT STRATEGY: GREENING THE FEDERAL FLEET

Presenter(s): Maggie Julian, Centre for Greening Government, Treasury Board Secretariat, Ottawa ON

The Centre for Greening Government tracks and reports on the federal government’s emissions centrally, coordinates greening efforts across government, and drives results to ensure the Government of Canada meets its greenhouse gas reduction targets. In December 2017, the federal government announced the Greening Government Strategy, which includes zero-emission vehicle (ZEV) targets for the federal fleet. This presentation will outline the federal fleet context, ZEV commitments, and the pathway towards the new targets. Challenge areas and efforts to collaborative on solutions will be highlighted.

TS6.3 INVESTMENTS IN TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIFICATION RD&D AT NATURAL RESOURCES CANADA

Presenter(s): René-Pierre Allard, Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa ON

Natural Resource Canada’s Office of Energy Research and Development (OERD) is the Government of Canada’s co-ordinator of energy research and development activities. OERD has supported innovative low-carbon vehicle technologies since the 1980s, with recent funding programs focusing on transportation electrification, energy efficiency, advanced materials, as well as the use of alternative fuels and emissions control technologies.  The presentation will provide an overview of the RD&D programs managed by NRCan’s OERD and will emphasize those addressing barriers for the EV sector, such as the Program of Energy R&D, the Energy Innovation Program, and the Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Demonstration Program.

TS6.4 ENABLING GREEN, SAFE, AND INNOVATIVE TRANSPORTATION

Presenter(s): Martha Christenson, Innovation Centre, Transport Canada, Ottawa ON

Transport Canada’s Innovation Centre (IC) is a multi-modal transportation RD&D organization. The IC is home to research programs such as the ecoTECHNOLOGY for Vehicles (eTV) Program. The IC is also responsible for the Motor Vehicle Test Centre in Blainville, QC – comprised of world class vehicle testing laboratories and test tracks.  The eTV Program proactively tests and evaluates the environmental and safety performance of emerging vehicle technologies to support codes, standards and regulations. Program results promote the safe and timely introduction of innovative and green technologies in Canada. Examples of testing and evaluation supported by the eTV Program include EV battery durability testing, as well as dynamometer testing of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and electric buses.

16:45 – 18:00

TS7. FLEETS #1 

Smart cities

Moderator:
Ben Sharpe 
  Senior Researcher and Canada Lead
The International Council on Clean Transportation

TS7.1 INCREASING THE DEPLOYMENT OF ELECTRIC VEHICLES IN SHARED AND AUTONOMOUS MOBILITY FLEETS

Presenter(s): Catherine Kargas, MARCON, Montréal QC

Given the greater mileage of vehicles used in shared passenger mobility (taxis, car sharing, ride hailing), the use of BEVs in these fleets would have a greater impact on GHG emissions reductions than the use of BEVs for personal use. With the increased popularity of shared use mobility models, it is imperative that electro-mobility play a greater role in these modes of transportation.   While current policies and charging deployment have the individual motorist in mind, increasing deployment of electric vehicles in these fleets will require a re-evaluation of policies and charging deployment strategies. This presentation will focus on the results of research undertaken by MARCON on behalf of the ZEV Alliance aimed at identifying the challenges and potential solutions for accelerating the deployment of electric vehicles within these fleets. Recommendations are based on financial analyses comparing BEVs in ride hailing and car sharing use in North America and Europe.

TS7.2 CYCLES OF POWER : HOW ELECTRIC BIKES ARE THE MISSING LINK FOR SMART CITIES AND CAN SERVE AS POSITIVE AGENTS OF CHANGE

Presenter(s): Michael Uhlarik, SURU Inc, Halifax NS

The e-bike is the fastest growing transportation sector in the world today, with sales in the US growing 90% in 2017.  Combined with the rise of bike sharing, and increasing vehicle-to-internet connectivity, powered two-wheelers hold a lot promise to revolutionize short range personal mobility while helping cities be cleaner and plan smarter.    Adapting to this new paradigm will demand finding the right balance between the needs and convenience of the e-bike users, and those of the rest of the community.  Unplanned deployment of dockles e-bike and scooter sharing have created friction between cities and operators.  But at the same time they have generated hyper-accurate real time commuter traffic data for municipalities, allowing them to create precise maps of organic traffic flow.    The e-bike is an opportunity beyond taking combustion engined cars off the road and freeing up the grid.  They can serve as the missing link, helping cities connect communities while generating accurate transportation data needed to plan and grow sustainably.

TS7.3 CHALLENGES TO ENABLING WIDESPREAD FAST CHARGING INFRASTRUCTURE

Presenter(s): Alexandre Beaudet, InnovÉÉ, Montréal QC

The number of fast chargers for electric vehicles (EVs) including cars and buses is increasing rapidly throughout the world, while some charging network operators and fleet managers are already planning and, in some cases, installing the next generation of ultra-fast chargers (150-350kW). These chargers can recharge an EV in just a few minutes, contributing to make them more attractive to consumers as well as to fleets and other commercial users. However, the development of a fast and ultra-fast charging infrastructure faces a number of challenges including the high cost of the chargers and of their installation and connection to the electric grid, high operating costs (including those related to demand charges), uncertainties with regards to charging standards, low returns on investment, and in the longer term the difficulty of integrating these new sources of electrical demand in the “smart” grids of tomorrow. This presentation will summarize and discuss these challenges and report on on-going initiatives to accelerate the deployment of fast chargers in Canada and internationally.

TS7.4 ROADMAP FOR THE ELECTRIFICATION OF THE PUBLIC BUS NETWORK IN BARCELONA

Presenter(s): Lluís Alegre Valls, Metropolitan Transport Authority of Barcelona, Barcelona SP

This presentation will discuss the roadmap for the electrification of the public bus network in the region of Barcelona in Spain, focusing on electrical network, infrastructures and the replacement of vehicles in a region scale.

16:45 – 18:00

TS8. CHARGING AHEAD

Technology & Innovation

Moderator:
Jeff Turner

 Consultant
Dunsky Energy Consulting

TS8.1 LOCAL ENERGY STORAGE USING FLYWHEELS FOR ULTRAFAST CHARGING STATIONS

Presenter(s): Maxime Dubois, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke QC

Fast charging stations are implemented globally. With 60 kW charging power, the current charging time remains in the order of 1 hour for a battery fill-up for vehicles intended for 200 – 300 km range. As technology evolves, the demand for larger capacities and shorter charging times will require ultrafast battery chargers with MW-range power. Still a very important issue is the ability of the local electrical grid to supply such high power for a few minutes. As a means to circumvent this problem, the ultrafast battery charger can be supplemented with a local energy storage medium. Storing energy locally using flywheels provides many advantages over other energy storage mechanism. If the rotating wheel is magnetically levitated, with a shaft also positioned with magnetic fields, this results in a frictionless system, with no wearing mechanism and thus very long lifetime. In this presentation, an overview of 10 years of research in frictionless flywheels will be discussed and the main results of a prototype of an entirely levitating flywheel will be demonstrated.

TS8.2 SOLAR-POWERED EVS AT YORK UNIVERSITY

Presenter(s): Jose Etcheverry, York University, Toronto ON

To address climate change and experiential learning our research team designed and installed in 2016 a solar photovoltaic charging station for electric vehicles at Toronto’s York University. Originally designed for enabling EV auto-sharing our station continues to evolve to meet the growing needs of Canada’s third largest university and the rapidly growing EV transportation sector. Our project combines local technological development with policy advice to create a versatile living laboratory aimed at meeting local needs and teaching how to learn by doing so students, faculty and staff can be involved in solving climate change.

TS8.3 THE OTHER ELECTRIC BUS: AN ALTERNATIVE TO CHARGE ELECTRIC BUSES USING ON BOARD FUEL CELL GENERATOR

Presenter(s): Daljit Bawa, Ballard Power Systems Inc., Burnaby BC

Transit agencies and operators are looking at options to green-up their fleets without affecting their daily operations. Fuel cell technology offers an attractive zero emission powertrain alternative for transit buses. A fuel cell bus is an electric bus where energy is stored as hydrogen gas and electricity is produced on board using a fuel cell power generator eliminating the need for road side charging infrastructures.
With a decade of experience and millions of kilometers in service, zero emission fuel cell electrical buses have proven their reliability and competitive operating costs offering a true one to one replacement for diesel or CNG buses even in harsh conditions like Canadian winters.

16:45 – 18:00

TS9. THE EV MARKET

Consumers & Policies

Moderator :
Andrea Brown

Senior Manager – Electrification Development
Ontario Power Generation

TS9. NEMASKA LITHIUM: FROM THE MINE TO THE ROADS

Presenter(s): Simon Thibault, Nemaska Lithium, Québec QC

Quebec already has expertise in R&D and companies that stand out in different niches related to transportation electrification. However, the lithium compounds used for the production of batteries are extracted and produced in mines outside Quebec that do not always meet the highest standards of social and environmental responsibility (negative environmental impacts, political instability, etc.) What Nemaska Lithium is proposing with the Whabouchi mining project and its lithium salt production plant in Shawinigan represents a significant step in the development of a Li-ion battery supply chain wholly Quebec-owned and respectful of the environment and the communities. This is another step towards the future, a greener future.

TS9.2 PREPARING FOR THE EV-OLUTION OF THE USED EV MARKETPLACE

Presenter(s): Cara Clairman, Plug’n Drive, Toronto ON

As electric vehicle (EV) sales continue to gain momentum, the used EV marketplace will start to emerge. This is especially true when you consider that the increasing availability of EV makes and models, lower operating/maintenance costs and EV-friendly policies that are driving change worldwide, will most likely result in EVs far outlasting their gasoline-powered counterparts.  The emergence of the used EV marketplace will attract a whole new demographic of car buyers that, until now, have been prevented from market entry due to higher upfront purchase costs. It will also mandate the need to help new EV drivers find used EVs near them while providing the kind of service that addresses the unique considerations buyers have when deciding on their next electric car.  This presentation will focus on the emergence of the used EV marketplace and the development of Plug’n Drive’s used EV portal as the industry prepares for the transformation of the EV buying demographic from “early adopters” to mass-market consumers.

TS9.3 IDENTIFYING EVIDENCE-BASED INSIGHTS TO PROGRESS CONSUMER ELECTRIC MOBILITY IN CANADA

Presenter(s): Mark Ferguson, McMaster Institute for Transportation and Logistics, Hamilton ON

The McMaster Institute for Transportation and Logistics is concluding a five year study that has examined many dimensions of the electric vehicle adoption landscape across Canada.  As part of this, two large national survey efforts have taken place in 2015 and 2018 which have shed considerable light on the viewpoints of the general consumer on electric vehicles.  In recent months, a significant integration effort has taken place to distill the main conclusions based on the analysis of the collected data.  The purpose of this presentation will be to capture the most important insights of this research and link them to 1) prospective policies and  2) strategies for public awareness that might best assist  in progressing the adoption of electric vehicles in Canada.

TS9.4 USING AI TO ASSESS EV DEMAND AND IDENTIFY LATENT BARRIERS TO PURCHASE

Presenter(s): David Adams, Global Automakers of Canada, Toronto ON; Kenton White, Global Automakers of Canada, Toronto ON

This presentation will focus on how Advanced Symbolics worked with the GAC to move beyond consumer surveys and utilize Artificial Intelligence to get a deeper understanding of the latent demand for electric vehicles in Canada, as well as the key barriers to purchasing EVs, both as the general public and as they become EV intenders.  GAC wanted to explore the potential differences that would arise from “observing” the market, as opposed to introducing bias into the market by asking questions that are part and parcel of the traditional survey methodology. Advanced Symbolics used their proprietary algorithms and applied it to Twitter to come up with some very specific and very interesting results that will be shared with attendees.

18:00 – 22:00

  Networking Evening presented by Hydro-Québec

Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec
179 Grande Allée Ouest

EV2019VÉ Conference & Trade Show
May 6th to 9th, 2019 | Hôtel Le Concorde, Quebec City, Quebec CANADA
Electric Mobility Canada (EMC) invites you to the 10th annual national event, taking place in Quebec City, Quebec from May 6th to 9th, 2019. Focusing on all modes of ground electric transportation, the EV/VÉ Conference and Trade Show is the most important and respected event in the EV industry in Canada.

Organised by

Electric Mobility Canada

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