April 24-27, 2018

The Westin Ottawa, Ottawa, ON

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25

8:00 – 9:00

Continental Breakfast in Tradeshow

09:00 – 10:15

Opening Plenary Session – Confederation I & II

Presenter: Karen McCrimmon, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport

Biography
A Canadian Forces pioneer, Ms. McCrimmon honed her leadership and team-building abilities in the service of her country. Ms. McCrimmon joined the Canadian Forces as a reservist. After graduating with a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Windsor, Ms. McCrimmon transferred to the Regular Forces where she quickly rose through the ranks. In 1981, she became an air navigator – the first woman to earn the qualification. In 1998, Ms. McCrimmon was promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel and appointed Commanding Officer of 429 Transport Squadron in Trenton, becoming the first woman to command a Canadian Forces flying squadron.

After retiring from the Canadian Forces in 2006, Ms. McCrimmon started her own business offering mediation services to both public and private institutions. She has been an active member of the Canadian Federation of University Women, the Royal Canadian Legion, and Canadian Women in Aviation – an organization focused on encouraging more women to become involved in the aviation industry.

Ms. McCrimmon served as Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Veterans Affairs and Associate Minister of National Defence from December 2015 to January 2017.

Ms. McCrimmon believes that our success as a nation has – and will continue to be – achieved through mutual respect, co-operation and dialogue. She currently lives in Kanata-Carleton with her husband.

Presenter: Jeff Lyash, President and Chief Executive Officer, ONTARIO POWER GENERATION

Biography
Jeff Lyash is the President and CEO of OPG. Lyash was formerly the president of CB&I Power where he was responsible for a full range of engineering, procurement and construction of multi-billion dollar electrical generation projects in both domestic and international markets. He also provided operating plant services for nuclear, coal, gas, oil and renewable generation.

READ MORE...

Prior to joining CB&I in 2013, Lyash served as Executive Vice President of Energy Supply for Duke Energy. He led engineering, maintenance and operations of the company’s 42,000-megawatt generation fleet, fuel procurement, power trading, major projects and construction, environmental programs, and health and safety programs.

Before the merger of Progress Energy and Duke Energy, Lyash served as Executive Vice President of Energy Supply for Progress Energy. In this role, he oversaw Progress Energy’s diverse 22,000-megawatt fleet of generating resources including nuclear, coal, oil, natural gas and hydroelectric stations. In addition, he was responsible for generating fleet fuel procurement and power trading operations.

Lyash began his career in the utility industry in 1981, joining Progress Energy in 1993. Before assuming the role of Executive Vice President of Energy Supply, he served as Executive Vice President of Corporate Development, President and Chief Executive Officer of Progress Energy Florida, Senior Vice President of Energy Delivery Florida, and Vice President of Transmission. He also held a wide range of management and executive roles in Progress Energy’s nuclear program, including Operations Manager, Engineering Manager, Plant Manager, and Director of Site Operations.

Before joining Progress Energy, Lyash worked for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in a number of senior technical and management positions throughout the northeast United States and in Washington, D.C, receiving the NRC Meritorious Service Award in 1987.

Lyash earned a Bachelor’s Degree in Mechanical Engineering from Drexel University, and was honored with the Drexel University Distinguished Alumnus Award in 2009. He has held a Senior Reactor Operator License from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and is a graduate of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management Executive Training Program and the Duke Fuqua School of Business Advanced Management Program.

Presenter: James Ellis, Senior Director Utility Solutions for ChargePoint North America

Biography
James Ellis is the Senior Director of Utility Solutions for ChargePoint, the world’s largest electric vehicle (EV) smart charging network. In this role, James advises electric utilities and other key stakeholders in North America on electric vehicle market trends and engagement strategies, and supports the development of products, programs and policies to raise awareness on the benefits of electricity as a fuel and help accelerate the adoption of EVs and EV charging equipment and services. Prior to joining ChargePoint, James served as the Director of Electrification and Electric Vehicles for Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) with a focus on developing strategies and programs to support utility customer needs in the fastest growing EV market in the United States (US). During this time, James also served as a board member for the California Electric Transportation Coalition and the California Plug-In Vehicle Collaborative, working with government and industry stakeholders to identify and advocate for accelerated transportation electrification through incentives, infrastructure, education and outreach initiatives.

James has also held additional leadership positions in the automotive and utility industries, including EV Regional Manager for Nissan North America in the Corporate Planning and Sales & Marketing organizations, and Senior Manager for Transportation and Infrastructure in the Environment and Technology Innovation organization at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), developing and implementing electrification programs and metrics, leading utility plug-in readiness activities and carbon reductions strategies.

Presenter: Catherine Kargas, MBA

Biography
Mobility strategist and advisor with 30 years of market research, business analysis and strategy experience. Expertise in mobility, specifically in electrification of transport (including but not limited to business models, policies, insurance, charging infrastructure), vehicular automation (including but not limited to business models, policies, insurance, business impacts and societal impacts), shared mobility and MaaS (Mobility as a Service), modal shift and integration and sustainable mobility.

Helping organizations in the private and public sectors prepare for the future of mobility through an understanding of the trends and technologies (and their impacts on the individual/customer, the business and society) and by positioning to take advantage of these trends and technologies. Depending on the context and the client, the latter means potentially developing policies, collaborations/partnerships with key stakeholders, acquisition of new talent, competencies and skills to meet the needs of a changing ecosystem or designing new products / services.

She works with the MaaS Alliance, leading one of the working groups and contributing to the advancement of two others.

10:15 – 10:45

Networking break sponsored by Honda 

10:45 – 12:00

TS1 . Smart Grid/Grid Impact – Réseau intelligent/Impact sur le réseau – Confederation I & II

Moderator /
Modérateur


Daniel Carr

Manager, Advanced Planning
Alectra Utilities

Charging Infrastructure

TS1.1 IMPACT OF ELECTRIC VEHICLES ON ONTARIO'S ELECTRICITY SYSTEM

Presenter(s): Keegan Tully, Ontario Power Generation, Toronto, ON

Author(s): Keegan Tully, Ontario Power Generation, Toronto, ON

Electric vehicles represent a major new use of electricity that could fuel demand growth in the coming years. Will Ontario’s electricity system be able to handle this new source of demand?

Ontario Power Generation has analyzed the impact of a variety of EV growth scenarios and charging patterns to determine how EVs could impact the electricity system. How will EVs impact the price of electricity, GHG emissions and the need for new investment in generation infrastructure? What options are available to maximize the positive impact of EVs?

TS1.2 UNDERSTANDING ELECTRIC CHARGING BEHAVIOR AND THE CORRESPONDING LOAD SHAPES

Presenter(s): Jamie Dunckley, Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA

Author(s): Jamie Dunckley, Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA; Kathy Knoop, Salt River Project, Tempe, AZ

Understanding the charging behavior of electric vehicle drivers is imperative to helping utilities forecast electric vehicle electricity loads. Using data loggers with minute resolution, Salt River Project (SRP) is tracking 100 electric vehicles over a two year time period to better understand when, where and how much electric vehicle drivers charge.

Preliminary analysis shows that almost half of all charge events are at power levels below 2 kilowatts and are probably mostly located at home. For drivers on a basic utility rate, weekday charging peaks occur when drivers arrive at work and when drivers return home from work. Preliminary analysis also shows that drivers on a ‘time-of-use-rate’ that incentivizes drivers to charge after 8 PM are very effective. While these EV drivers are still considered ‘early adopters’ the effectiveness of TOU rates are promising. Emerging analysis is working on separating the load shapes into workplace, home and public. These loads will be significantly different from each other as drivers use each location very differently in terms of charge times and charge rates.

TS1.3 FROM CONNECTED TO MANAGED RESIDENTIAL CHARGING STATIONS: A SMART GRID APPROACH

Presenter(s): Foued Barouni, AddÉnergie Technologies, Québec QC

Author(s): Foued Barouni, AddÉnergie Technologies, Québec QC

According to recent research and market studies, more than 70% of Electric Vehicles (EV) are charged at home. The increasing deployment of residential charging stations has led Canadian utilities to question the impact of such new devices on the grid.

Utilities are required to distribute charging events to occur off-peak hours. This can be achieved by remotely controlling residential charging stations as defined by classic demand response (DR) programs. Network planners are interested in connecting these stations to a renewable power source such as solar or wind. There are other operational challenges related to residential charging stations such as cybersecurity and device life cycle management.
In this presentation, we will discuss Managed Residential Charging (also referred to as V1G) as an emerging paradigm that helps utilities. We will illustrate some existing approaches, and we will review future trends.

TS1.4 V2X OPPORTUNITIES IN CANADIAN PROVINCIAL ELECTRICITY MARKETS

Presenter(s): Hajo Ribberink, Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa ON

Author(s): Nathaniel Pearre, Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa ON; Hajo Ribberink, Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa ON

V2X (Vehicle-to-Anything) is the generic term for using energy stored in EV batteries for purposes external to the vehicles themselves. V2X can for instance be an important solution in stabilizing electrical grids with high fractions of renewables. Successful implementation of V2X relies on the monetized benefit of these services clearly exceeding their costs.

The diversity in the electrical generation systems in Canada result in there being no ‘one size fits all’ answer to the question of which V2X strategies are most appropriate. High-value grid reliability services are likely targets, but are unavailable in most provinces. In this study, market conditions and opportunities for V2X services in the desperate provincial electricity markets will be described, and the prospects for specific services evaluated. For each jurisdiction, a set of appropriate target services will be discussed, along with their economic assessment.

10:45 – 12:00

TS2. Transit & Trucks Technologies – Technologies du transport en commun et camions – room Quebec

Moderator /
Modérateur


Pierre Ducharme

President
MARCON

Technology & Innovations

TS2.1 THE OPPCHARGE PROTOCOL – STANDARDIZING OPPORTUNITY CHARGING SYSTEMS FOR BATTERY ELECTRIC BUSES ACROSS CANADA

Presenter(s): Anaissia Franca, CUTRIC, Victoria BC

Author(s): Anaissia Franca, CUTRIC, Victoria BC; Dr. Josipa Petrunic, CUTRIC, Toronto, ON; Dr. Anahita Jami, CUTRIC, Toronto ON; Lana Sanderson, CUTRIC, Calgary AB

Phase I of the Pan-Canadian Electric Bus Demonstration & Integration Trial lead by CUTRIC
aims to overcome the challenges associated with a lack of wide-spread commercialization-oriented demonstration & integration trials in Canada. The project will integrate different models of e-buses to test, demonstrate and prove out the interoperability of standardized e-bus designs. The main focus of the project is to design a standard overhead charging system, the OppCharge Protocol. This protocol is actively influencing the discussions about the international standard SAE J3105 regarding standardization of opportunity charging.

This presentation will discuss the standard charging protocol design process, along with the expected outcomes and innovation goals of the project. To support the planning of phase I, a simulation tool was developed in-house to predict the electricity usage of the e-buses for the various routes selected by the Brampton Transit, York Region Transit and TransLink. The model can predict charging costs caused by the high powered-requirements of the chargers. This cost can then be compared to the costs of diesel buses experiencing the same driving conditions.

TS2.2 DEVELOPMENT OF A NOVEL REAL TIME AND OFFLINE ELECTRIC BUS BATTERY HEALTH MONITORING SYSTEM

Presenter(s): Christopher Basilio, Red River College, Winnipeg MB

Author(s):  Christopher Basilio, Red River College, Winnipeg MB; Seokmin Mike Oh, Red River College, Winnipeg MB; Jeongsoo Bae, Red River College, Winnipeg MB; Jojo Delos Reyes, Red River College, Winnipeg MB; Morley Fortier, Winnipeg Transit, Winnipeg MB; James Hall, Winnipeg Transit, Winnipeg MB; Eugene Paget, New Flyer Industries Inc., Winnipeg MB

As the primary source of energy for electric vehicle, the reliance on lithium ion battery to ensure uninterrupted power supply is becoming increasingly important. Moreover, to ensure that this electric storage device perform its function in efficient and reliable way, the need to precisely monitor performance, degradation, health and failure prediction are essential.

In this study, the methodologies, tools, techniques, challenges and opportunities on developing a Real time and Offline Electric Bus Battery Health Monitor System including the data analytics will be presented. Ambient temperature effects on the battery performance and reliability will be included in the analysis, as this will be critical during the freezing weather condition where degradation of battery performance and increase in charging frequencies are expected. The team developed a system that can monitor in real time or offline an Electric Bus Battery health. The insight gathered from the data analytics was instrumental on ensuring the e-bus battery reliability and performance especially during the winter season, including a valuable tool for predictive maintenance.

TS2.3 INTEGRATED DESIGN PROCESS OF A NEW ALL-ELECTRIC ALUMINUM FRAME URBAN MICRO-BUS

Presenter(s): Olivier Côté, Innovative Vehicle Institute (IVI), St-Jérôme QC

Author(s): Olivier Côté, Innovative Vehicle Institute (IVI), St-Jérôme QC; Frédérick Prigge, Innovative Vehicle Institute (IVI), St-Jérôme QC

The presentation is about the design process and some technical characteristics of an urban electric micro-bus prototype. The design context is interesting because it involves a coordinated collaborative team work between “InfoDev-Electronic Designer International”, “Styl&Tech-design” and “Innovative Vehicle Institute” teams to merge knowledge and get the fastest design track possible.

The “µBus” ’s aims to serve low population density municipalities and routes. The propulsion system includes components having one of the best power density available on the market. With its fully bonded aluminum frame assembly, load passenger capacity and attributed energy storage weight have been increased. A special attention has been paid on space and energy efficiency. For instance, the energy storage system fluid shares the cabin temperature management loop, equipped with an heater and an air conditioner, so battery benefits of a fully controlled temperature without adding any heavy components.

TS2.4 DRIVING INNOVATION IN BATTERY-ELECTRIC BUSES

Presenter(s): Dale Hill, Founder, Proterra

Author(s): Dale Hill, Founder, Proterra

Proterra is driving innovation in the Battery-Electric bus space. The presentation will touch on technology improvements such as expanded range that allows the Proterra bus to travel up to 560 kilometers on a single charge; a new drivetrain that offers 2x the horsepower of standard diesel engine; and the Proterra cold weather package for extreme winter conditions.

 

10:45 – 12:00

TS3. Integrated e-Mobility in Urban Settings – E-mobilité intégrée en milieux urbains – room Ontario

Moderator /
Modérateur


Raed Abdullah

Innovation, Grid Technology
Hydro Ottawa Limited

Consumers & Policies

TS3.1 REVIEW OF THE ELECTRIC SSV PILOT PROJECT IN DOWNTOWN MONTREAL

Presenter(s): Marco Viviani,  Vice-president strategic development, Communauto inc., Montréal QC

Author(s): Marco Viviani,  Vice-president strategic development, Communauto inc., Montréal QC

Last May, as part of its Transportation Electrification Strategy, the City of Montreal provided 115 on-street parking places for self-service electric vehicles in Downtown Montreal. Communauto, a carsharing pioneer in North America, is the first and only company that claimed those places to make them available to its users. To this end, Communauto deployed an innovative technological solution : web and mobile platforms allowing users to track in real-time the availability of parking spaces in order to access and leave vehicles. The procedure did not require the implementation of expensive infrastructure by the municipality.

The presentation will provide data on typical routes and the use of electric vehicles :
• variations in use according to the period of the week and typical routes;
• variation in the rate of use of electric vehicles since the start of the project and effect on parking.

TS3.2 An Electrizing “Mobility as a Service” Concept

Presenter(s): Pierre Lavigueur,  STL – Marco Viviani, Communauto and Georges Tannous, Taxi COOP Laval

Author(s): Pierre Lavigueur,  STL – Marco Viviani, Communauto and Georges Tannous, Taxi COOP Laval

Three partners in the field of sustainable mobility are working on electrification projects that may lead to an “electric MaaS”. The presentation will discuss the global project in itself, but will focus mainly on the electrification projects of each partner: Communauto, a car-sharing company already operating electric vehicles, Coop Taxi de Laval and its plan for electric taxis, and the Société de transport de Laval with different electrification projects for its bus fleet.

TS3.3 CHARGING INFRASTRUCTURE NEEDS FOR ELECTRIC TAXI FLEETS IN CANADA

Presenter(s): Mohamed Ghorab, Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa ON

Author(s): Mohamed Ghorab, Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa ON; Hajo Ribberink, Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa ON

An optimal recharging infrastructure is critical for the successful operation of an electric taxi fleet within the context of the general taxi business model in Canada, i.e. where taxi drivers are the owners of the vehicles and most vehicles are on the road 24/7. Electrified taxis therefore will have to rely heavily on relatively expensive DC Fast Charging, which negatively influences the payback period of the electric taxi.

The potential to use a significant number of less expensive Level 2 charging stations complementing fewer DCFCs was investigated in a simulation study, which used real-world driving data from taxis in Winnipeg, MB. Results of the study will be presented, highlighting the influence of driving patterns of different taxis, of seasonal differences (auxiliary energy consumption), and of charging power level on the feasibility of the electric taxi concept and the possibility to reduce the number of DCFCs required.

TS3.4 EV CORRIDOR - THE ALBERTA EXPERIENCE

Presenter(s): Francois Blouin, ATCO, Calgary AB

Author(s): Francois Blouin, ATCO, Calgary AB; Jeanie Chin ATCO, Edmonton AB; Trevor Tkach ATCO, Edmonton AB

Alberta is growing its EV infrastructure network. There is no incentive yet in Alberta but despite that, ATCO and its partners NRCan, addenergie and Canadian Tire have decided to lead and promote adoption . We would like to share our experience in planing , engineering and deploying the first Alberta corridor between Calgary and Edmonton. We will highlighs the lessons learned from a utility perspective, the customer feedback as well as some statistics in usage, operation and maintenance

12:00 – 13:00

Buffet Lunch sponsored by Ford

13:00 – 14:30

Panel #1 – Integrated e-Mobility evolution – Confederation I & II

Tomorrow’s mobility will be electric, autonomous, and shared.  All means of transportation (individual cars, mass public transit, targeted public transit, ride hailing, car sharing, etc.) will evolve in an integrated mode.  
What are the key policies that governments should to emphasizing to accelerate this transition, to bring an integrated mobility offering to the consumer? 
The seamless integration of modes of transportation in a Mobility as a Service (MaaS) is desired by numerous jurisdictions, but presents many challenges. Panelists will discuss their views, and how to overcome the barriers to a true integration.

Moderator /
Modératrice

Catherine Kargas
Vice-President
MARCON, and Board Chair, Electric Mobility Canada

Presenter: Nic Lutsey, Program director, electric vehicles, International Council on Clean Transportation

Biography
Dr. Nic Lutsey directs the ICCT’s electric vehicle work and co-leads its U.S. activities. Nic manages the ICCT’s role as the Secretariat for the International Zero-Emission Vehicle Alliance. He has co-authored 19 peer-reviewed journal articles and dozens of reports on technology potential, regulatory design, and policy cost-effectiveness. Previously, with the California Air Resources Board, he participated in the regulatory development of the 2004 and 2012 greenhouse gas emission regulations for automobiles. He received a B.S. in Agricultural and Biological Engineering from Cornell University and a Ph.D. in Transportation Technology and Policy from the University of California, Davis.

Presenter: Dan Mathieson, Mayor of Stratford

Biography
Dan Mathieson is in his fourth term as Mayor and has sat on municipal council since 1995.   He is currently Chair of the Ontario Municipal Property Assessment Corporation (MPAC), Past Chair of Kings University College at Western University, Chair of the Stratford Police Services Board, a member of the Board of Directors of Festival Hydro and Rhyzome Networks and the Stratford Shakespeare Festival.   Dan is also a Governor on the Board of i-Canada.

In November, 2015, Dan was awarded the Alumni Award of Excellence from Master of Public Administration, Local Government program at Western University.  In 2012, Dan was chosen by the Canadian Advanced Technology Alliance (CATA) to receive the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal, paying tribute to community leaders whose endeavours have set them apart as technology innovators.  As well, Dan received the Queen Elizabeth II Golden Jubilee Medal in 2002 for public service.

Dan holds an ICD.D Designation through the Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto.   He also holds a Bachelor of Arts Degree from the University of Guelph and a Masters of Public Administration Degree from the University of Western Ontario.

Presenter: Jon Walker, Head of Transportation Policy at Lyft

Biography
Jon is a Transportation Policy Manager for Lyft. Externally, Jon works closely with public and private transportation stakeholders. Jon is particularly focused on advanced city design, electric vehicles, and autonomous vehicles and how these three elements together can remake our cities. Internally, Jon works with Lyft’s research, operations, and product teams to help design and deploy new products, strategies, and services that meet the needs of cities and their residents. 

Most recently, Jon was a manager at Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) in Colorado where he ran RMI’s autonomous and electric vehicles program. At RMI, Jon co-authored Peak Car Ownership – The Market Opportunity of Electric Automated Mobility Services which projects that mobility services like Lyft, performed by electric, autonomous vehicles, will overtake personally owned vehicles in market share in the next decade. Prior to RMI, Jon worked as a design engineer and engineering manager in the aerospace and IT industries.

Master of Engineering – Energy Systems Engineering – University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Bachelor of Science – Mechanical Engineering – Northwestern University

 

Presenter: Raed Kadri, Director of Automotive Technology and Mobility Innovation at Ontario Centres of Excellence (OCE).

Biography
He leads the Automotive and Mobility portfolio which includes the Autonomous Vehicle Innovation Network (AVIN) initiative, which will ensure that Ontario unlocks the economic potential of connected/autonomous vehicles (C/AV) including urban and smart mobility, transportation systems and enabling infrastructure technologies and will help Ontario’s transportation systems and infrastructure prepare for the deployment and adoption of these emerging technology.

Raed also leads the Automotive Supplier Competitiveness Improvement Program (ASCIP), which seeks to increase the sourcing capabilities of Ontario-based small and medium sized automotive suppliers, while encouraging innovation and productivity initiatives that increase success in export markets.

Raed is a graduate in Industrial Engineering from the University of Windsor. He later earned a Master of Science in Industrial Engineering from Wayne State University in Detroit as well as a Master of Science in Business and Management Research from Henley Business School in the UK. He is currently pursuing his Doctorate in Business Administration at Henley Business School.

14:30 – 15:00

Networking break sponsored by Honda 

15:00 – 16:30

TS4 . Charging Infrastructure in Cities – Infrastructure de recharge en milieux urbains – Confederation I & II

Moderator /
Modérateur


Alec Tsang

EV Infrastructure Program Manager at BC Hydro

Charging Infrastructure

TS4.1 HOW EV CHARGING IS DRIVING SMART CITIES TO ADOPT ZERO-EMISSION TRANSPORT

Presenter(s): Tom Ashley, VP of Policy, Greenlots, Los Angeles, CA

Author(s): Ashley Horvat, Greenlots, Los Angeles, CA

As cities across North America grapple with population density, poor urban air quality and congestion , smart cities, regulators and utilities are coming together to accelerate electric vehicle adoption by creating new market opportunities. While regulators are ushering in policies to synchronize renewable energy sources like solar with grid assets like EVs, charging network providers are designing new business models that work to resolve existing market barriers. At the intersection of EVs and the grid lie economic opportunities to help smooth expensive peak energy loads with storage and demand response programs while prioritizing equitable infrastructure investments. According to Navigant Research, global vehicle-to-grid (V2G) frequency regulation revenue is expected to reach $190.7 million by 2022, with North America representing the strongest initial market opportunity for EVs as a grid service.

Greenlots’ Vice President of Public & Private Partnerships and “Oregon’s Electric-Car Czar,” Ashley Horvat, will share what policies, technologies, and business models are driving the next wave of electric vehicle adoption across Canada and the U.S.

TS4.2 DEPLOYMENT OF A PUBLIC NETWORK OF CHARGING STATIONS FOR EVS IN MONTREAL : FIRST RESULTS

Presenter(s): Guillaume Longchamps, Urban design advisor, City of Montreal, Montreal QC

Author(s): Guillaume Longchamps, Urban design advisor, City of Montreal, Montreal QC

In June 2016, the City of Montreal adopted a Transportation Electrification Strategy to take a leadership role. One of the measures proposed was to offer a network of 1,000 charging stations, mainly on-street, to serve the entire municipal territory. In partnership with Hydro-Quebec’s Electric Circuit, Montreal will install 400 on-street charging stations by the end of 2017. Thhe City wants to meet the needs of its citizens, in particular in heavily populated residential areas, where there are few parking places for charging. In addition, this network will allow self-service electric vehicles’ suppliers to charge their fleet.

In recent years, the City of Montreal was able to adjust its charging infratructure deployment strategy by taking into account technical and legal considerations, urban integration, and fair distribution throughout its territory. Moreover, the management of such a network requires the coordinated action of partners, such as Hydro-Quebec and the Montreal electric services commission.

TS4.3 THE CITY OF RICHMOND'S EV CHARGING INFRASTRUCTURE REQUIREMENTS FOR NEW DEVELOPMENTS - OPPORTUNITIES TO PROVIDE ACCESS TO EV CHARGING FOR ALL NEW RESIDENTIAL PARKING

Presenter(s): Brendan McEwen, City of Richmond. Richmond BC

Author(s): Brendan McEwen, City of Richmond. Richmond BC

Access to “at home” charging is one of the most important factors influencing whether a household will choose to adopt an EV. The cost and hassle of renovating multifamily shared parking areas especially has proven to be a key barrier to greater EV adoption. And in many of Canada’s growing urban areas, multifamily buildings represent the dominant form of new housing.

The City of Richmond, British Columbia, is in the process of updating its electric vehicle charging infrastructure requirements for new residential developments. In late 2017 it is expected that City Council will consider a Richmond Zoning Bylaw amendment requiring that all residential parking spaces in new buildings feature an energized outlet capable of providing Level 2 charging. Costing analysis conducted for the City has shown that designing for EV energy management systems can significantly reduce the costs for new developments to meet this requirement.

This presentation will review the City’s proposed requirement, costing analysis, and stakeholder engagement process, and share insights that can inform the development of similar requirements in other jurisdictions.

TS4.4 CHARGING NEIGHBOURHOODS FORWARD – UTILITY POLE CHARGING

Presenter(s): Jack Simpson, Toronto Hydro, Toronto, ON

Author(s): Jack Simpson, Toronto Hydro, Toronto, ON

Toronto Hydro’s EV program is focused on breaking down barriers to EV ownership and on providing charging station accessibility to those in need. Because of Toronto’s densely populated community, many residential homes do not have private driveways/garages and rely on overnight street parking. For this group of “Garage Orphans” a straightforward installation of a charging station attached to the home is not viable; some early EV adopters have even attempted to install makeshift solutions that potentially put others in the community at risk of harm.

Toronto Hydro, in cooperation with the City of Toronto, is working to deploy a pilot project installing residential public EV charging stations. This presentation will provide an overview of the program’s installations and explore the technical and other lessons learned from the project to date.

15:00 – 16:30

TS5. Innovative EV applications – Applications novatrices VÉ – room Quebec

Moderator /
Modérateur


Frederick Prigge

Research and Development Director
Innovative Vehicle Institute

Technology & Innovations

TS5.1 THERMAL MANAGEMENT OF AUTOMOTIVE BATTERY PACKS

Presenter(s): Steven Recoskie, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, ON

Author(s): Steven Recoskie, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, ON; Ken Darcovich, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, ON; Florin Ilinca, National Research Council Canada, Boucherville, QC

The present trend of ever increasing energy densities and more aggressive usage scenarios in automotive battery packs brings with it a growing requirement for thermal management. To address this situation, automotive suppliers and OEMS are seeking a deeper technical understanding of the highly coupled role of the materials, design, integration and operation of EV battery packs. In this context, NRC has been researching such systems and has developed a range of test procedures, characterization methods and numerical simulation tools aimed at optimizing the thermal environment for best battery performance and service lifetimes. While the electrochemical function of a battery generates heat, and elevated temperatures can cause premature aging, the heat can be dissipated through active or passive cooling systems. Active systems rely upon cooling plate configurations and coolant channeling, while passive systems rely upon the pack assembly design scaffolding which also serves as a heat sink and conduit. An overview of the coupled electrochemical-thermal environment will be presented along with results of investigations aimed at optimal thermal management of the packs.

TS5.2 ADVANCES IN BATTERY ELECTRIC POWER FOR MINING MACHINERY PROPULSION

Presenter(s): David Francis Lyon, MEDATECH Engineering Svc. Ltd., Collingwood ON

Author(s): David Francis Lyon, MEDATECH Engineering Svc. Ltd., Collingwood ON

Going diesel-free is an ambitious goal. A typical mine can have dozens of diesel engines across its heavy equipment fleet. Going electric means enormous up front costs, and massive retraining. It means turning away from an entire industry that exists to maintain and replace machines on demand. Most of all, it means embracing the reality that until recently, the technology to create a diesel-free mine was barely a realistic possibility.

So why do it?

David Francis Lyon, a BEV and mining equipment enthusiast will describe how going electric is possible and more importantly profitable for the mining industry. He’ll focus on the technology of today and on how he and his team intend to conquer converting a 200,000lbs haul truck to all electric. He will tackle everything from fast charging concepts to temperature management of Li-Ion Batteries. (Reference projects here: www.altdrivesystems.com)

TS5.3 ANALYZING THE REVEALED PREFERENCES OF CURRENT ELECTRIC VEHICLE OWNERS: A MULTI-CRITERIA DECISION-MAKING MODELLING APPROACH

Presenter(s): Moataz Mohamed, Department of Civil Engineering McMaster University, Hamilton ON

Author(s): Moataz Mohamed, Department of Civil Engineering McMaster University, Hamilton ON; Mark Ferguson, McMaster Institute for Transportation and Logistics, Hamilton ON

The electric vehicle (EV) is considered a promising solution to mitigate transportation-related greenhouse gas emissions. Several studies have been developed to predict the potential market penetration of EVs by identifying behavioural and preference aspects that attract potential EV users. However, these studies are limited in their capacity as predictive models. Few studies have been developed that highlight the salient characteristics, profiles, and perceptions of current EV owners, and even less considering the important distinction between Battery Electric Vehicle (BEV) and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) owners.

The present study investigates the revealed preferences of BEV and PHEV Canadian owners across nine constructs: vehicle attributes, environmental concern, social norm, personal moral norm, identity, attitude, affordability, willingness to consider behavioural changes, and perceived behavioural control. The analysis is carried out using a multi-criteria decision-making model, namely the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP). The results show that PHEV and BEV owners exhibit different preferences towards their electric vehicle technologies and highlight some valuable insights to promote EVs in the Canadian market.

TS5.4 AFFORDABLE CHARGING INFRASTRUCTURE THROUGH SMART STREETLIGHT CHARGERS

Presenter(s): Hesam Yazdanpanahi, ATCO Electric, Edmonton AB

Author(s): Hesam Yazdanpanahi, ATCO Electric, Edmonton AB; Natalie Hilbrecht, ATCO Electric, Edmonton AB

Low-cost yet highly accessible chargers are required to encourage BEV adoption among consumers without garages such as downtown apartment dwellers, for businesses looking to attract customers without large capital investments and for municipalities looking to create downtown charging scenarios. In these cases, if the required electrical infrastructure is not readily accessible the construction costs can be prohibitive. We propose a low-cost solution that utilizes existing streetlight circuits in conjunction with unique charger settings and control systems to ensure the streetlight’s main function, to produce light, is not compromised. The viability of this idea is tested with both Light Emitting Diode (LED) streetlights as well as High Pressure Sodium (HPS) streetlights.

15:00 – 16:30

TS6. EV Related Programs – Programmes en lien avec les VÉ – room Ontario

Moderator /
Modératrice


Andrea Brown, P.Eng.

Managing the Electric Vehicle Strategy 
Ontario Power Generation

Consumers & Policies

TS6.1 THE EVOLUTION OF CANADIAN CONSUMER ATTITUDES TOWARD ELECTRIC VEHICLES (2015-2018)

Presenter(s): Mark Ferguson, McMaster Institute for Transportation and Logistics, Hamilton ON

Author(s): Mark Ferguson, McMaster Institute for Transportation and Logistics, Hamilton ON; Moataz Mohamed, McMaster Institute for Transportation and Logistics, Hamilton ON

In mid-2015, the McMaster Institute for Transportation and Logistics carried out an extensive national consumer stated preference survey of over 20,000 Canadian households to assess openness to electric vehicles. The effort yielded a comprehensive picture of how consumer perceptions of electric vehicles vary across the country from province-to-province, city-to-city and even between small census areas. In early 2018, a similar exercise is to be completed with the primary objective to being to understand how perceptions, attitudes and preferences are evolving over the last three years as information and experiences in relation to electric vehicles is gradually disseminating across Canada. The purpose of this presentation will be to report on preliminary results of a comparison between 2015 and 2018 results.

TS6.2 HOW UTILITIES CAN USE GAMIFICATION TO SHIFT & SHAPE ELECTRIC VEHICLE CHARGING LOADS: CASE STUDY ON UTILITY OFF-PEAK CHARGING REWARDS PROGRAMS

Presenter(s): Scott Lepold, FleetCarma, Waterloo ON; Mark Goody, FleetCarma, Waterloo ON

Author(s): Scott Lepold, FleetCarma, Waterloo ON; Mark Goody, FleetCarma, Waterloo ON

Historically, utility companies have faced the challenge of low enrollment rates when implementing electric vehicle (EV) time-of-use (TOU) rates. When EV owners are required to install a second meter and pay an additional delivery charge to measure their charging load separate from their household, there is little incentive to adopt an EV-specific rate. This is where gamification comes into play. Gamification uses elements of game design and principles and applies them to encourage user engagement, loyalty, and certain behavior. A popular gamification strategy is using rewards that can be offered in different forms such as points, levels, and achievement badges.

An increasing number of utility companies are using gamification strategies to encourage energy efficiency such as Nest’s Rush Hour Rewards program. In the context of EVs, utilities have started implementing gamification strategies to encourage certain charging behaviors – such as off-peak – without having to introduce a new TOU rate. This presentation will explore gamification strategies in the context of managing charging behavior and will draw upon findings from innovative utility off-peak charging rewards programs.

TS6.3 EMPLOYING BEST PRACTICES FROM THE ENERGY EFFICIENCY WORLD TO DESIGN EFFECTIVE UTILITY EV PROGRAMS

Presenter(s): Philippe Dunsky, Dunsky Energy Consulting, Montreal, QC

Author(s): Jeff Turner, Dunsky Energy Consulting, Montreal, QC; Philippe Dunsky, Dunsky Energy Consulting, Montreal, QC

Utilities across North America spend billions of dollars on energy efficiency (EE) programs each year, enabling 10’s of billions in savings for their customers in the process. This scale of investment is exactly the kind of support that would help overcome a wide range of barriers for adoption of electric vehicles. There are many lessons that can be learned from the EE world that can help to make sure that utility EV programs are effective in driving adoption, and that they do so in a way that is cost effective and fair for all stakeholders.

Dunsky is working with a Canadian utility to develop a transportation efficiency strategy that builds on approaches that have been employed with great success for EE programs. This includes the development of a transportation efficiency Technical Reference Manual (TRM). By quantifying the potential costs and benefits of a range of transportation efficiency measures, this TRM provides key inputs for the planning and program design stage, and enables results tracking and impact evaluation.

TS6.4 HOW TO LAUNCH AN EV RELATED INCENTIVE PROGRAM - LESSONS LEARNED FROM OPERATING EV INCENTIVE PROGRAMS FOR DIFFERENT STAKEHOLDERS IN THE U.S. AND CANADA

Presenter(s): Simon Ouellette, ChargeHub (by Mogile Technologies Inc), Montreal QC

Author(s): Simon Ouellette, ChargeHub (by Mogile Technologies Inc), Montreal QC

Over the past two years, ChargeHub has helped many different EV industry stakeholders launch and manage EV related incentive programs. These include OEMs and Utilities.
Through its active role in these projects, ChargeHub has learned a lot about some of the factors that can make or break different types on incentive programs. While each program is unique, there are a number of common factors that have show to be critical in providing a program with the best chances of achieving the desired success.

This presentation provides key actionable know-how based on past and ongoing EV incentive programs, to help your organisation/jurisdiction implement the most efficient and successful EV incentive programs.

16:45 – 18:00

TS7 . Transit & Trucks Charging – Recharge du transport en commun et camions – Confederation I & II

Moderator /
Modérateur


Benoit Boulet
Associate Dean, (Research & Innovation), Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
McGill University

Charging Infrastructure

TS7.1 DESIGNING CHARGING SOLUTIONS TO OPTIMIZE POWER AND SCALABILITY FOR BUS FLEET ELECTRIFICATION

Presenter(s): Kevin Christopher, ChargePoint, Fleet & Transit Solutions

Author(s): Leah O’Dwyer, ChargePoint, Campbell, CA; David Peterson, ChargePoint, Campbell, CA

Innovation in bus electrification is increasing rapidly with nearly all bus manufacturers developing electric buses. Buses have unique needs for charging due to their power requirements and duty cycles. Buses have very large batteries that may need to be charged in short periods of time, however this requires very high power. Consequently, many fleets overbuild the electrical infrastructure for charging by designing to their fleets’ maximum charging capabilities, rather than their operating needs. The complexity of understanding the power requirements from bus fleets, combined with designing scalable, future-proofed and cost-effective infrastructure can be significant barriers to deployment. To address these barriers and deliver optimum power, bus duty cycles and overall bus-drive management need to be analyzed and integrated into the design of infrastructure solutions, and integrated into fleet operations software. Furthermore, scalable charging systems that can be built out over time provide a cost-effective way to future-proof infrastructure investments. In this presentation, ChargePoint will discuss how it is working with both bus manufactures and customers to deliver cost-effective charging solutions that optimize power and scalability.

TS7.2 INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENTS ON INFRASTRUCTURE FOR ELECTRIC BUSES

Presenter(s): Stephanie Medeiros, ABB Inc., Montréal QC

Author(s): Stephanie Medeiros, ABB Inc., Montréal QC

In this informative session, the following topics will be addressed:

• Standardization for charging of electric buses: what solutions are there and where does it go to?
• From pilot to real life operation: what is needed for rolling out a reliable charge infrastructure?

This presentation will bring together experts who understand both the investment and commercial reality of implementing charging infrastructure. Having worked closely with cities, bus operators and bus manufacturers worldwide for almost a decade, the presenter will discuss the latest developments in this fast emerging industry.

TS7.3 PLUGGING IN TO AN ELECTRIC BUS FUTURE

Presenter(s): Jack Simpson, Toronto Hydro, Toronto, ON

Author(s): Jack Simpson, Toronto Hydro, Toronto, ON; Bem Case, Toronto Transit Commission, Toronto, ON

The Toronto Transit Commission (TTC) is charging ahead with the purchase of 30 long range battery electric buses (BEB). This is a great opportunity to eliminate 100% of tailpipe bus emissions from city streets and help the City of Toronto achieve the ambitious TransformTO goals or reducing 80% of GHG emissions by the year 2050. Moving from a diesel bus fleet to all electric has its challenges; primarily, that the current technology BEB is not able to meet the needs of all existing routes the TTC operates today; secondly, the electrical infrastructure required to manage the charging needs of an entire battery electric bus fleet are significant. This presentation will explore the operational challenges of going electric and the challenges of installing electrical infrastructure to support electric bus charging.

TS7.4 CHARGING SYSTEM FOR BUSES – CURRENT INDUSTRY STATUS AND STANDARDS EVOLUTION

Presenter(s): Maxime Ouellet, Nova Bus, division of Volvo Group of Canada, St-Eustache, QC

Author(s): Maxime Ouellet, Nova Bus, division of Volvo Group of Canada, St-Eustache, QC; Jocelyn Lefebvre, Nova Bus, division of Volvo Group of Canada, St-Eustache, QC

Considered a novelty a few years ago, electric buses are now included in public transit procurement plans and can be considered an attractive alternative to hybrids and diesel buses.

Range often grabs headlines, gathering attention and occupying the central topic of electrified vehicles discussions; however, in a transit bus reality, the real challenge lies in the charging infrastructure, which must have both high power and high capacity, and is a complete departure from current diesel and hybrid refueling systems. Thus, with various manufacturers’ offers and customers’ requirements, standardization becomes essential to achieve interoperability and controlled costs, ensuring reliability while becoming a commodity.

•  Various charging systems presentation for both on-route rapid charging and depot charging;
• Current status in standards development in North America, namely SAE J3105, J3068 and J1772;
• Potential use in transit buses applications.   

16:45 – 18:00

TS8. Battery Technologies – Technologies des batteries – room Quebec

Moderator /
Modérateur


Eddy Zuppel

Program Leader, Vehicle Propulsion Technologies
National Research Council Canada

Technology & Innovations

TS8.1 TOWARDS EXTENDING THE DRIVING RANGE OF EVs: IMPROVING THE PRACTICAL ENERGY DENSITY OF LI-ION BATTERIES USING HIGHLY PERFORMING MATERIALS PREPARED BY A DROP-IN TECHNOLOGY

Presenter(s): Yaser Abu-Lebdeh, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa ON

Author(s): Yaser Abu-Lebdeh, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa ON; Mathieu Toupin; National Research Council Canada, Ottawa ON; Véronique Gauthier, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa ON; Florence Perrin-Sarazin; National Research Council Canada, Ottawa ON Xiuyun Zhao; National Research Council Canada, Ottawa ON; Olga Naboka; National Research Council Canada, Ottawa ON; Chae-Ho Yim, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa ON; Svetlana Niketic, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa ON; Jean-Yves Huot National Research Council Canada, Ottawa ON

Increasing the energy density for Li ion batteries is very crucial for extending the driving range of EVs and enable their mass market penetration. In this presentation, we will summarize our recent research activities that are focused on following a holistic approach to improve the performance of the Li-ion battery’s main components (electrodes and electrolyte) simultaneously. We will describe in details the preparation and characterization of nano-Si/natural graphite composite anodes with target capacities between 500 and 1000 mAh/g and made by a non-disruptive, drop-in technology. We will describe the results of Li-ion half-cell testing of more than 50 compositions with different composite ratios, binder type, silicon and graphite type (shape, size and surface chemistry) and different processing conditions. Also, we will show the results of full cells using NMC cathode, a carbonate solvent mixture and various additives. We will conclude by introducing the most suitable approach to follow for future directions to reach increased practical energy densities with reasonable cycle life of the battery, at low cost and minimum disruption to manufacturing process.

TS8.2 SEIZING THE OPPORTUNITY FOR CANADA IN CURRENT AND FUTURE ELECTRIC VEHICLE SUPPLY CHAINS

Presenter(s): Brian St. Louis, Avalon Advanced Materials Inc. & Ontario Cleantech Materials Group (OCMG), Toronto ON

Author(s): Brian St. Louis, Avalon Advanced Materials Inc. & Ontario Cleantech Materials Group (OCMG), Toronto ON; Paul Ferguson, Great Lakes Graphite, Toronto ON; Linda Nazar, University of Waterloo, Waterloo ON; Ian London, Canadian Rare Earth Element Network (CREEN), Montreal QC

Countless announcements by global automakers and industrials, backed by billions of dollars of investment commitments in downstream supply chains, confirms the move towards a low carbon transportation world is undeniably occurring, and will play out for years to come.

The mass proliferation of electric vehicles requires numerous material inputs in to their batteries and fuel cells, as well as within numerous other areas of the vehicle (i.e. light weighting). These cleantech materials, manufactured to tight specifications, via innovative processes, include graphite, lithium, cobalt, scandium, vanadium and rare earth elements. Canada has key strategic advantages in natural resource endowment and technical processing and research expertise which must be leveraged to participate in this monumental shift.

This presentation describes the opportunities presented by transformation to traditional supply chains, and the new possibilities in burgeoning ones, all requiring increased and groundbreaking cleantech material production. These opportunities can and must be leveraged to create economic opportunities and jobs in Canada while anchoring the domestic manufacturing of further downstream components critical to the electrification of transportation.

TS8.3 NICKEL-ZINC BATTERIES WITH REPLACEABLE ZINC CARTRIDGES AS A PRACTICAL ALTERNATIVE TO LITHIUM BATTERIES

Presenter(s): Iakov Kogan, Panisolar, Mississauga ON

Author(s): Iakov Kogan, Panisolar, Mississauga ON; Anna Khomenko, Panisolar, Mississauga ON

This presentation discusses possible opportunities of use large-sized nickel and zinc alkaline batteries. While contemporary lithium batteries offer impressive combination of energy density and power, the natural reserves of lithium are insufficient, and with some minor exclusion of Quebec, are located in Asia and South America. Lithium batteries are still unsafe cost to Samsung about $5.3billion after recall of Note 7 cell phones in 2016. In past nickel-metal hydride batteries have been used in 2 million hybrid vehicles worldwide. Practical examples will be focused on nickel-zinc batteries with replaceable zinc cartridges. The zinc cartridge is proved to provide at least 730 cycles of charge/discharge in ongoing tests, and can be exchanged biannually to extend battery life to 10,000 cycles, specific of nickel hydroxide electrodes. Panisolar’s batteries intended for behind the meter solar-plus-storage applications show 85%-90% recharging efficiency, have flat shape, about 1 cm thickness, and can be mounted on walls of the buildings and backsides of solar panels. Nickel electrodes are based on proprietary technology of nickel hydroxide with berry-like morphology.

16:45 – 18:00

TS9. GHGs & Environmental Benefits – GES et avantages environnementaux – room Ontario

Moderator /
Modératrice


Annie Bérubé

Government Relations Director
Équiterre

Consumers & Policies

TS9.1 IMPACT OF VEHICLE ELECTRIFICATION ON THE REDUCTION OF CANADIAN GHG EMISSIONS

Presenter(s): Miyuru Kannangara, National Research Council of Canada (NRC), Ottawa ON

Author(s): Leila Ahmadi,National Research Council of Canada (NRC),Ottawa ON; Miyuru Kannangara, National Research Council of Canada (NRC),Ottawa ON; Farid Bensebaa, National Research Council of Canada (NRC), Ottawa ON

Canada has committed to eliminate 219 MT of GHG emissions by 2030. Accounting for 23% of all GHGs, the transportation sector will need to develop and deploy low emission technologies and reduce the carbon footprint of fossil and alternative fuels. Although there are numerous environmental studies, technology developers and potential users do not have access to easy-to-use tools to evaluate alternative solutions through clear pathways. Lack of openness in data and uncertainties at each stage of a pathway (province, vehicle technology, transport mode, fuel source) may lead to misleading conclusions and ill-informed decisions.

A bottom-up framework allowing GHG analysis of each pathway (see figure) has been developed for each geographical area (city, region or province). Relevant electrical vehicle pathways ranking based on GHG saving are evaluated. GHG saving will be estimated after comparing proposed (2030) with baseline (2015) scenarios for each geographical area. National GHG emissions savings are obtained by aggregating provincial estimations. To reflect reality, stochastic distributions will be integrated in the proposed framework to evaluate uncertainty, identify risks and develop mitigation strategies.

TS9.2 GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION MODELLING FOR THE TRANSIT SECTOR

Presenter(s): Anahita Jami, Canadian Urban Transit Research & Innovation Consortium (CUTRIC) & University of Toronto, Toronto ON

Author(s): Anahita Jami, Canadian Urban Transit Research & Innovation Consortium (CUTRIC) & University of Toronto, Toronto ON; Dr. Josipa Petrunic, CUTRIC, Toronto ON; Kristina Mlakar, CUTRIC & UofT, Toronto ON; Dr. Amer Shalaby, UofT, Toronto ON

The objective of this research is to map out the greenhouse gas (GHG) footprint of Ontario’s transit agencies, which will help policymakers and transit agencies measure year-to-year GHG emissions. The purpose of these measurements is to use them to quantify the manner in which Ontario transit systems could qualify for Cap and Trade revenues in the future to advance the technology and ridership solutions aiming at GHG reduction and achieving Ontario’s climate change goals.

A system-by-system evaluation of transit agencies has been developed to better understand which transit companies are low, medium, or high emitters based on GHG emissions from mobile sources. This evaluation has led to the creation of a draft Report Card documenting a relative score for each transit agency. Four preliminary indicators were chosen to develop the Report Card: CO2e per passenger, per revenue vehicle kilometer, CO2e per passenger, per service area density, CO2e per vehicle, per revenue vehicle kilometre, and CO2e per vehicle, per service area density.

TS9.3 PREDICTED IMPACT OF ELECTRIC VEHICLE UPTAKE ON REGIONAL AIR CONTAMINENT AND GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS IN THE METRO VANCOUVER REGION

Presenter(s): Eve Hou, Metro Vancouver, Burnaby BC

Author(s): Eve Hou, Metro Vancouver, Burnaby BC; Francis Ries, Metro Vancouver, Burnaby BC; Jonn Axsen, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby BC; Michael Wolinetz, Navius Research, Vancouver BC

Electric vehicles produce zero tailpipe emissions and have potential to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and improve air quality where they are used. The emission impacts of three uptake scenarios were modelled for the Metro Vancouver region. The scenarios reflect different degrees of policy support by consumers for light duty electric vehicles: (1) baseline, with weak demand-focused polices, (2) strong demand-focused policies, and (3) strong supply- and demand-focused policies. These scenarios were applied to a model of the actual vehicle fleet, taking into account natural turnover, vehicle kilometres travelled, and projected vehicle growth rates for this region.

The EPA MOVES model was used to derive emissions forecasts for criteria air contaminants (CACs) and GHGs for 2015 through 2035. The transition to electric vehicles is projected to significantly reduce GHGs (7% and 21% by 2035 in Scenarios 2 and 3, respectively) and have a measurable impact on CACs (5% and 13% reduction for PM2.5 by 2035 in Scenarios 2 and 3, respectively). Strong supply and demand policies are needed to support EV uptake.

18:00 – 20:00

Networking Evening presented by Ontario Power Generation

Ontario Power Generation is inviting you to the EV2018VÉ networking evening in the Conference foyer. Food and drinks will be served from 6:00PM to 8:00PM. Drink coupons are included in your delegate’s badge.

EV2018VÉ Conference & Trade Show
April 24th to 27th, 2018 | The Westin Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, CANADA

Electric Mobility Canada (EMC) invites you to the 9th annual national event, taking place in Ottawa, Ontario from April 24th to 27th, 2018. Focusing on all modes of ground electric transportation, the EV/VÉ Conference and Trade Show is the most important and respected event in the EV industry in Canada.

Organized by

Electric Mobility Canada

Share This