WEDNESDAY MAY 31

08:00 – 09:00

Foyer

Continental Breakfast/Petit déjeuner

09:00 – 9:45

Conference III

Government-Industry Summit/Sommet gouvernement-industrie

Simultaneous Interpretation / Interprétation simultanée

The Honourable
Steven Del Duca

Minister of Transportation

Steve Carlisle
President & Managing Director
General Motors of Canada Company

Joni Paiva
President
Nissan Canada

 

09:45 – 10:15

Foyer

Networking Break/Pause réseautage

10:15 – 11:45

Conference III

TS06 | Keys to Successful Policies/Clés pour des politiques réussies

Moderator / Modératrice
Chantal Guimont
President & CEO at Electric Mobility Canada

TS06-1 LCA AND TECHNOLOGICAL RIVALRIES: THE CASE OF HYDROGEN AND ELECTRIC VEHICLES

Presenter: Alexandre Beaudet, InnoVÉÉ

Authors: Alexandre Beaudet, InnovÉÉ, Montreal QC

New technologies rarely prevail across all relevant dimensions of merit (e.g. cost, durability, carbon footprint), leaving an important role for social, political and economic dynamics to shape and determine technological rivalries. This paper looks at the specific case of the automotive sector where lifecycle analysis (LCA) has been used to influence policy. Since the 1990s, advocates of electric vehicles (EVs) and hydrogen-powered fuel cell vehicles (FCVs), along with those favoring other alternative technologies and fuels, have been competing for both public and private support, often referring to LCA results.

Specifically, this study addresses the following question: can LCA conclusively demonstrate whether EVs or FCVs provide the highest potential for reducing GHG emissions and displacing oil consumption? Drawing on existing studies complemented with original estimates, the study finds that, contrary to what is often proclaimed in the literature, there is no conclusive evidence favoring either option. It seems that many studies suffer from bias; when designing LCA studies, proponents of EVs and FCVs have tended to emphasize assumptions and scenarios that suit their preferred option.

 

TS06-2 THE CITY OF VANCOUVER'S EV ECOSYSTEM STRATEGY

Presenter: Ian Neville, City of Vancouver

Authors: Ian Neville, City of Vancouver, BC

The City of Vancouver committed to deriving all energy from renewable sources before 2050 under the Renewable City Strategy in 2015. A key action to achieve that commitment was to develop an EV infrastructure strategy that will support a transition to renewable transportation. The City’s role in infrastructure deployment was determined in part by barriers to private sector infrastructure deployment, including:

-Limited return-on-investment from EV infrastructure for the private sector under current utility commission rules
-EV uptake that is too low to create adequate demand for public stations, while a lack of charging options limits demand for EVs.
-Prohibitive building retrofit costs for property owners and residents to install EV charging.

Vancouver’s EV Ecosystem Strategy includes 32 actions to expand access to home and workplace charging, improve the public charging network, and integrate EV infrastructure into core City processes. Through these actions, the City will support the early EV market by ensuring charging infrastructure is present, available and reliable; and, reserve the option to transition away from operating infrastructure once critical market size is achieved.

 

TS06-3 ZERO EMISSION VEHICLE SUPPLY IN CANADA

Presenter: David Adams, Global Automakers of Canada

Authors: David Adams, Global Automakers of Canada, Toronto, Ontario

Is the greater uptake of zero emission vehicles a supply or demand issue?

Vehicle manufacturers have consistently stated that they provide product to meet consumer demand. ZEV enthusiasts, environmental non-government organizations, and some government officials have suggested that manufacturers are not providing a sufficient volume of ZEV’s to the marketplace for consumers to test and experience in order to determine whether or not they wish to purchase a BEV, PHEV, or in the near future a FCEV. For those that have already made the decision to purchase a BEV or PHEV, the criticism is often that there are few vehicles at dealerships for them to choose from.

The intent of this discussion is to explore the critical factors for the manufacturers in providing ZEVs to the market in Canada and the challenges and opportunities related to different public policy tools being employed to shift the market towards decarbonized passenger vehicle transportation.

 

TS06-4 GETTING MORE ELECTRIC VEHICLES ON THE ROAD: REAL WORLD INSIGHTS FROM THE OEM ALL THE WAY TO THE PROSPECTIVE EV OWNER

Presenter: Simon Ouellette, Charge Hub ; George Bousioutis, Kia Canada Inc

Authors: Simon Ouellette, ChargeHub (by Mogile Tech), Montreal QC ; George Bousioutis, Kia Canada Inc, Mississauga ON

ChargeHub has been working closely with automakers, dealerships and prospective EV buyers to streamline the EV buying process.

One automaker with whom ChargeHub has collaborated more extensively is Kia Canada. Through this collaboration, interesting insights have been gathered and unforeseen obstacles have been identified at various levels of the EV distribution process.

This presentation shows some of the insight gathered and some of the obstacles encountered. It also presents actions taken in light of this information in order to augment the number of electric vehicles on the road.

 

Conference I

TS07 | Infrastructure of the Future/Infrastructure d'avenir

Moderator / Modérateur
Sanjeev Pushkarna
Manager, Customer Solutions at Nova Scotia Power

TS07-3 EV CHARGING AT 400KW: NEXT GENERATION INFRASTRUCTURE

Presenter: Muffi Ghadiali, ChargePoint

Authors: Muffi Ghadiali, ChargePoint, Campbell CA USA

The release of the Chevy Bolt will fuel even more demand for EVs since it removes range limitations that have deterred many drivers from going electric, and is priced for mass market buyers. Many other auto manufacturers will release long range cars over the next few years. EV driver expectations also continue to shift as long range cars and more EVs on highways will make faster charging critical.

Fast DC will require changes to car standards, changes to the way utilities price electricity, and changes in EV charger technology. Organizations involved with EV charging will want to consider if Fast DC should have a role in their infrastructure, and understand it’s markedly different economics and operating characteristics. They’ll also need to be equipped to evaluate Fast DC solutions as technology evolves, and prepare for new levels of charging performance and scale that will become available. This presentation will cover the latest EV and driver trends. Technological considerations including system architecture, efficiency, scaling, and how it fits in transportation strategies going forward will all be discussed.

 

 

 

 

TS07-2 ELECTRIC VEHICLES AND TRANSACTIVE ENERGY

Presenter: Dan Guatto, Burlington Hydro

Authors: Dan Guatto, Burlington Hydro, Burlington ON

EVs are a critical piece of the energy puzzle. This presentation will discuss their grid integration through intelligent, managed charging and interaction with other distributed energy resources setting the stage for LDC 2.0, the new utility business model. Emphasis will be placed how these energy resources will disrupt legacy energy patterns and provide for enhanced flexibility, new service offerings and lower energy cost. As part of the presentation, a strategy developed for EV charging in multi-residential buildings will be used to help illustrate the point.

 

 

 

TS07-3 IMPACT OF CLUSTERS OF DC FAST-CHARGING STATIONS ON THE DISTRIBUTION GRID IN OTTAWA

Presenter: Hajo Ribberink, Natural Resources Canada

Authors: Hajo Ribberink, Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON ; Larry Wilkens, Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON

The introduction of longer-range Electric Vehicles (EVs), like the Chevrolet Bolt and the Tesla III, will greatly increase the need for DC Fast Charging (DCFC) to facilitate longer trips or provide regular recharging for EV owners who cannot charge at home.

The impact of high-power DCFC stations on the distribution grid, however, may be significant. Natural Resources Canada and Hydro Ottawa are therefore collaborating in a study to investigate this impact. The first phase of this study consisted of determining the number of DCFCs needed and their locations in Ottawa for the period 2017 – 2037. Taking into account expected trends in EV sales, the evolution of EV battery size and of the BEV/PHEV sales ratio, the distribution of EV sales over EV owners who can charge at home and ‘garage orphans’, and expected EV usage patterns and associated charging needs, the local need for DCFCs at a range of typical locations was determined. The methodology used in this study will be presented together with results for various scenarios of EV uptake.

 

 

11:45 – 13:30

Conference III

Awards Luncheon/Dîner – Remise de prix

 

Mark Henderson
Senior Vice President
Energy Solutions & Services for Alectra Energy Solutions

13:30 – 15:00

Conference III

TS08 | Electrification of Public Transit/Électrification du transport public

Moderator / Modérateur
Serge Carignan
Technical Director at Association du transport urbain du Québec

TS08-1 MODELING AND SIMULATION OF BATTERY ELECTRIC BUSES

Presenter: Tyson McWha, NRC-CNRC

Authors: Tyson McWha, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa ON

The integration of battery electric buses into ongoing transit operations requires a thorough understanding of the operational implications of such buses. The performance of battery electric buses is more heavily dependent upon the environments in which they operate than conventional diesel or diesel-electric hybrid buses. Factors such as route selection, passenger loading, changes in elevation along routes, weather events, charging capacity and infrastructure location must all be considered in order to select the optimal battery electric bus model or models. This presentation will focus on the Fleet Forward methodology – as developed by the National Research Council Canada – for modeling and simulation of battery electric buses to ensure potential operators are fully prepared for the successful integration of these vehicles into their existing fleets.

 

TS08-2 PLUG-IN HYBRID PROPULSION SYSTEM FOR COMMERCIAL VEHICLES

Presenter: Eric Azeroual, TM4

Authors: Eric Azeroual, TM4 Inc., Boucherville QC

All public transit authorities in the province of Québec, Canada, have declared their intention to fully electrify their fleet by 2025, but currently, the electric infrastructure for public transportation is either inexistent or limited. In order to offer a more flexible solution to the transit authorities, a new consortium formed by TM4 Inc., Cummins and the Société de Transport de Laval (STL) has developed and assembled a new and more efficient plug-in hybrid drivetrain for heavy vehicles. This new plug-in solution is an intermediate step between existing hybrid and EV technologies. The proposed solution will allow transit authorities progressive electrification of their bus fleet according to their recharging infrastructure and routes. With two or more charging events on a specific route, a fuel reduction of more than 50% can be attained compared to a conventional diesel vehicle. Two buses will be demonstrated in real life conditions by the Société de Transport de Laval during two years.

 

TS08-3 SELECTING AN ELECTRIC BUS FOR A TRANSIT SYSTEM

Presenter: Pierre Ducharme, MARCON

Authors: Pierre Ducharme, MARCON, Montreal, Québec

Canadian public transit systems are challenged to adopt clean technologies by funding agencies and elected officials while maintaining operational costs at the current level, or lower. How is this possible? MARCON is currently involved in the preparation of one of Canada’s largest BRT projects in the country and had to answer: Can we go electric? MARCON also completed a full economic and environmental lifecycle analysis for Edmonton Transit System in early 2016 after completing its study of a pan-canadiana charging system for the CCME.

The presentation will include a description of the latest all-electric bus implementations in both North America and Europe as well as the bus models and charging technologies available to transit systems. The specific challenges associated with each technology will be discussed.

 

 

 

TS08-4 ELECTRIFICATION OF URBAN BUSES IN LAVAL: MOVING FOWARD / ÉLECTRIFICATION DES AUTOBUS URBAINS À LAVAL : IL FAUT ALLER DE L’AVANT

Presenter: Pierre Lavigueur, STL

Authors: Pierre Lavigueur, Société de transport de Laval, Laval QC ; Sylvain Boucher, Société de transport de Laval, Laval QC

The era of demonstration projects is coming to an end, public transit must resolutely be electric. After the acquisition of a slow-charging bus in 2013 and the conclusive tests that followed, a final project will be launched in 2017 to test an electric bus with range extender. In that same year, a study carried out in collaboration with the STM and AVT will complete the picture to end the debate between slow and fast charging.

The roadmap was clearly defined: complete electrification of a first bus route in 2019 with 10 vehicles, followed by a new garage adapted to electric buses in 2021 which will allow the purchase of electric vehicles in the following year. The Société de transport de Laval will have completed its electric conversion by 2035.

The presentation will review the progress of electrification in Laval regarding current projects and the whole electrification plan.

[Français]
L’ère des projets pilotes tire à sa fin, le transport collectif doit résolument s’électrifier. Après l’acquisition d’un autobus à recharge lente en 2013 et les tests concluants qui ont suivi, un dernier projet verra le jour en 2017 pour tester un autobus électrique avec prolongateur d’autonomie. Une étude réalisée en collaboration avec la STM et AVT viendra compléter le portrait, aussi en 2017, pour clore le débat entre la recharge lente et la recharge rapide.

Par la suite, la feuille de route est clairement définie : électrification d’une première ligne d’autobus complète en 2019 avec 10 véhicules, puis construction d’un nouveau garage adapté aux autobus électrique en 2021, ce qui permettra l’achat de véhicules électrique à compter de l’année suivante. À terme, la Société de transport de Laval aura complété sa conversion à l’électrique pour 2035.

La présentation fera le tour des avancées du dossier de l’électrification à Laval, autant au niveau des projets actuels que du plan d’électrification complet.

 

 

 

Conference I

TS09 | New Approaches to Charging and Storage/Nouvelles approches pour la recharge et le stockage

Moderator / Modérateur
Eric Mallia
General Manager at FleetCarma

TS09-1 DISTRIBUTED STORAGE: EV CHARGING NEEDS & OPPORTUNITY

Presenter: Lin Khoo, Greenlots

Authors: Lin Khoo, Greenlots, San Francisco CA USA

From carsharing to ridesharing to transit and goods movement, as electric vehicles proliferate, distributed storage will increasingly become critical to minimizing distribution system and site costs.

Electric vehicles of all weight classes are getting bigger batteries and longer ranges. More and higher power charging is required to support them locally and along travel corridors. Storage can mitigate demand charges and minimize capacity upgrades necessary to support the deployment of charging stations.

Managed, aggregated EV charging has all the capabilities of storage but for—currently—the ready ability to discharge. By charging when the grid has surplus capacity and renewables are generating, managed charging is a critical tool for grid operators to clean the grid while minimizing impact to other electricity users.

Managed storage and managed charging can minimize costs and maximize value for site hosts. This session will provide an overview of how Greenlots is working with cities, distribution companies, automakers, and site hosts to plan for an electrified transportation future.

 

TS09-2 RESIDENTIAL ENERGY PERSPECTIVE IN ONTARIO

Presenter: Brett Smith, Ministry of Energy

Authors: Brett Smith, Ministry of Energy, Toronto ON

In 2004, Ontario started down the path of modernizing its distribution systems with the Smart Metering Initiative. By 2011, over 4.8 million smart meters were installed across the province for low-volume consumers, mainly households. In the same year, the Smart Grid Fund was launched, which has supported the demonstration of several technologies that will help the province move closer to modern and efficient distribution grids.

Some of these projects have focused on electric vehicles, and what utilities can do with customers to minimize their grid impacts. As Ontario moves forward with its Climate Change Action Plan, and more EVs hit the road, concerns about edge-of-grid impacts will continue to grow. Thus, Ontario is looking to develop a roadmap on how to optimally integrate electrified transportation onto the grid, which could include ways to manage overall household demand.

The Ministry is currently investigating the opportunities and challenges for Ontario, which has close to 70 different distributors. This presentation will focus on results to date, and reflect on activities elsewhere and how they might apply in Ontario.

 

TS09-3 ASSESSING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF A PUBLIC CHARGING STATION NETWORK IN MONTREAL/IMPLANTATION D'UN RÉSEAU PUBLIC DE BORNES DE RECHARGE À MONTRÉAL: UN PREMIER BILAN

Presenter: Gilles Dufort, Ville de Montréal

Authors: Gilles Dufort, Direction de l’urbanisme, Ville de Montréal, Montreal QC

In 2013, as part of its transportation electrification strategy, the City of Montreal launched the deployment of a public charging infrastructure for the installation of 1,000 on-street charging stations by 2020. Furthermore, the City is also installing additional charging stations in municipal facilities as well as planning a network of fast charging stations.

The representatives of the City of Montreal will present a summary of the actions, issues and results achieved to date in the planning, implementation and use of this public charging network.

[Français] Dans le cadre de sa stratégie d’électrification des transports, la Ville de Montréal a amorcé, en 2013, le déploiement d’une infrastructure publique de recharge visant l’installation de 1000 bornes sur rue d’ici 2020. À celles-ci s’ajoutent des bornes complémentaires aux équipements municipaux de même que la planification d’un réseau de bornes de rechage rapide.

Les représentants de la Ville de Montréal présenteront un bilan des actions, des enjeux et des résultats obtenus à ce jour en matière de planification, d’implantation et d’utilisation de ce réseau public de bornes de recharge.

 

TS09-4 PERFORMANCE CHARACTERIZATION OF A VEHICLE-TO-HOME ELECTRICITY STORAGE SYSTEM

Presenter: Alain Joseph, Nova Scotia Community College

Authors: Alain Joseph, Nova Scotia Community College, Dartmouth NS ; Jamie Thomson, Nova Scotia Community College, Dartmouth NS

Electric vehicles offer the potential to provide additional energy services beyond basic local transportation, in particular, the potential to shift electrical grid demand, serve as a backup energy supply, and to store surplus renewable energy. The Nova Scotia Community College (NSCC) energy distribution using advanced telemetry and analytics (EnergyDATA) program has configured a Mitsubishi iMIEV Battery Electric Vehicle (BEV) with commercially available power electronics to create a custom 4 kW Vehicle-to-Home (V2H) power system for research and demonstration purposes. The V2H system is designed to charge and discharge a 16 kWh vehicle main battery pack via connection with renewable energy ‘nanogrids’ at the NSCC Applied Energy Research Laboratory (AERLab) and energy-demonstration Pilikan House. An examination of V2H system roundtrip energy efficiency was conducted to provide performance data and allow the evaluation of anticipated high-efficiency second generation systems containing optimized inverter technologies. This paper presents initial results of V2H system operation for applications including demand management, islanded support of electrical loads, and energy storage for residential-scale applications.

 

Conference II

TS10 | Grid Impact and Smart Management/Impact réseau et gestion intelligente

Moderator / Modérateur
Frederic Prigge
R&D Director at Institut du véhicule innovant

 

TS10-1 IMPACT OF EV CHARGER LOAD ON DISTRIBUTION NETWORK CAPACITY: A CASE STUDY IN TORONTO

Presenter: Mohamed Awadallah, Ryerson University

Authors: Mohamed Awadallah, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON ; Birendra Singh and Bala Venkatesh, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON

This presentation introduces a study on the impact of the electric vehicle charger load on the capacity of distribution feeders and transformers of an urban utility. A residential neighborhood of the city of Toronto is selected to perform the study based on survey results which showed high tendency of EV adoption. The two most loaded distribution transformers of such neighborhood are studied with their cable feeders via steady-state simulations in CYME software. A worst case scenario of full EV penetration is studied where all chargers are connected to the system simultaneously at peak summer or winter load. Effect of increasing the rate of EV adoption on the performance of distribution networks is examined with correlation to ambient temperature. Finally, the impact of increasing charger size on system performance is explored. The results send a few warning signals of potential equipment overload to utility companies under certain system loading and EV charging levels, impacting utility future planning and operation. This will assist utilities in taking measures for operating the existing system and planning for the future.

 

TS10-2 INTEGRATING PLUG-IN ELECTRIC VEHICLES AND THE ELECTRICITY GRID: THE REPAC-IESD PROJECT

Presenter: John Axsen, SFU-START

Authors: Jonn Axsen, SFU-START, Vancouver BC ; Michael Wolinetz, Navius Research, Vancouver BC; Jotham Peters, Navius Research, Vancouver BC

The REPAC-IESD project uses a behaviourally-realistic model to simulate how utility-controlled charging (UCC, a specific form of vehicle-grid-integration) of plug-in electric vehicles (PEV) may affect the cost and potential to reduce greenhouse-gas (GHG) from the present to 2050 in two transmission-connected regions: British Columbia and Alberta, Canada. We use three unique models in this project:

  1. A PEV market share model that uses data from the Canadian Plug-in Electric Vehicle Study to simulate consumer choice for vehicles.
  2. A charging choice model that also uses empirical data to define consumer acceptance of UCC.
  3. An electricity system model that defines the hourly operation and long-term evolution of each electricity grid

The results show that UCC, at a wholesale level or system-wide level, has a small but beneficial impact on electricity prices in a strong GHG reduction policy scenario. On a per-vehicle basis, UCC reduces electricity system costs by roughly 50-75 $/yr per participating PEV throughout 2050. UCC primarily reduces system costs by reducing the amount of generation capacity needed to satisfy peak load.

 

TS10-3 DEMAND RESPONSE MANAGEMENT BY SMART CHARGING OF ELECTRIC VEHICLES WITH DEEP LEARNING

Presenter: Karol Lina Lopez, Université Laval

Authors: Karol Lina Lopez, Université Laval, Québec QC ; Christian Gagné, Université Laval, Québec QC

A Demand Response Strategy (DRS) in the context of smart charging of Electric Vehicles (EVs) allows EV’s users to minimize their overall energy cost while contributing to softening peak electricity demand, thus making the grid more efficient and reliable. In this work, we aim at designing an intelligent DRS using deep learning, to make online decisions based on various auxiliary data, including environmental, pricing and demand time series, to determine when charging or standby modes should be selected during connection sessions of an EV to a charging station. This would be done without requesting the expected connection time to the user. We achieve this by first calculating the optimal solution of historical connection sessions using dynamic programming. Then, with these optimal decisions and other auxiliary historical data, we train classification models using deep learning. Through simulations and comparison with baseline models, we demonstrate that a properly trained deep network is able to reduce charging costs significantly, often close to the optimal charging costs computed with knowledge of the true future car usages and energy price.

 

 

TS10-4 ELECTRIC VEHICLES BATTERIES AS A DISTRIBUTED ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEM IN SMART GRIDS: A POLICY STUDY

Presenter: Shahab Shokrzadeh, York University

Authors: Shahab Shokrzadeh, York University, Toronto ON ; Mark Winfield, York University, Toronto ON

Electrification of vehicles is a key solution to displacing fossil fuels in transportation and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The adoption of electric vehicles (EVs) is growing rapidly due to the availability of more efficient batteries and higher electric range capability, lower vehicle costs, and more widely available charging infrastructure. In typical duty cycles, EVs are parked more than 90% of the time that provides significant opportunities as distributed energy storage systems. EV batteries can serve as a grid-connected electric storage device that flow electricity to the grid and back, providing several power system services through the vehicle-to-grid (V2G) and grid-to-vehicle (G2V) concepts. This research investigates the policy and regulatory frameworks for distributed energy storage integration in leading jurisdictions, including Canada, the United States and Europe. There will be a focus on the role of battery storage systems in vehicular applications to support higher penetration of intermittent renewable energy like solar and wind. The results provide an overview of policy initiatives and programs among regulators, utilities, and system operators for EV integration in the smart grid.

 

15:00 – 15:30

Foyer

Networking Break/Pause réseautage

15:30 – 17:00

Conference III

TS11 | Electrification of Public Transit/Électrification du transport public

Moderator / Modérateur
Serge Carignan
Technical Director at Association du transport urbain du Québec

 

TS11-1 STABILITY THRU DEMAND: NIGHT TIME CHARGING IMPACT ON GRID STABILITY FOR FLEETS OF LONG-RANGE ELECTRIC TRANSIT VEHICLES

Presenter: Matt Jurjevich, BYD Heavy Industries

Authors: Matt Jurjevich, BYD Heavy Industries, Los Angeles CA USA

Over the past decade the adoption of battery electric powertrains in the public transit application has outpaced adoption by marketshare over any vehicle category. With more than 20,000 long-range electric transit buses that have been in operation for up to 5 years now substantial data is now available and utilities are rapidly moving towards the preference and even legal regulation towards night time charging. For the first time in history the industry’s largest manufacturer is stepping forward with an analysis on this data and the findings are incredible.

 

 

TS11-2 ELECTRIC BUSES: A FULL TRANSIT NETWORK ANALYSIS OF ENERGY DEMANDS AND UTILITY IMPACTS

Presenter: Moataz Mohamed, McMaster University

Authors: Moataz Mohamed, McMaster University, Hamilton ON ; Hany Farag, York University Toronto ON; Nader El-Taweel, York University, Toronto ON; Mark Ferguson, McMaster University, Hamilton ON

The study simulates the operation of Battery Electric Bus (BEB) on a full transit network. First, using three BEB concepts: flash, opportunity, and overnight, a real-time simulation for Belleville Transit is developed to test BEB operation feasibility and quantify the energy demand from the transit system. Second, we utilize the generated energy demand to measure the impact of the BEB transit system on the utility grid. Particularly, we study the impact on the utilization and lifetime of the transformers, and the operation of the local distribution grid. The results deliver some contradictory messages; from the transit perspective, flash and opportunity BEBs are more operationally feasible, however they suffer from high and intermittent power demands. Overnight electric buses have relatively less impacts on the substation transformer and distribution feeders overloading, voltage regulation and quality aspects, and operation of voltage control devices, but have limited availability for operation. Collectively, findings from this study highlight that the selection of BEBs in a full network transit operation hinges on achieving feasible operation while reducing impacts on utility grid.

 

TS11-3 OPTIMIZED SOLUTION FOR ELECTRIC TRANSIT BUS SYSTEM

Presenter: Frederic Delrieu, NovaBus

Authors: Frederic Delrieu, Nova Bus, Saint-Eustache QC

This study reviews the expectations from transit authorities on the implementation of electric buses in urban transit. While showing obvious environmental benefits, the operational and economic features of electric buses still need to be demonstrated. Amongst the different technical solutions, the fast charging – a.k.a opportunity charging when located at the route terminal – brings clear advantages in terms of uptime, weight, total cost of ownership while integrating well into the traffic operations. This study aims at understanding the different advantages of this solution and proposing a view on a whole electric transit system configuration.

 

TS11-4 INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENTS ON INFRASTRUCTURE FOR ELECTRIC BUSES

Presenter: Daniel Simounet, Abb Inc.

Authors: Daniel Simounet, Abb Inc., Montréal QC ;
Daan Nap, ABB Inc., Rijswijk, Netherlands

 

In this informative session, the following topics will be addressed:

  • Standardization for charging of electric buses: what solutions are there and where does it go to?
  • From pilot to real life operation: what is needed for rolling out a reliable charge infrastructure?

This presentation will bring together experts who understand both the investment and commercial reality of implementing charging infrastructure. Having worked closely with cities, bus operators and bus manufacturers worldwide for almost a decade, the presenter will discuss the latest developments in this fast emerging industry.

Conference I

TS12 | Batteries and Electric System Impacts/Batteries et impact sur les systèmes électriques

Moderator / Modérateur
Ron Van Holst
Automotive Technology and Mobility Innovation at Ontario Centres of Excellence

 

TS12-1 GLOBAL BATTERY MARKET AND TECHNOLOGICAL TRENDS, HIGH LEVEL OVERVIEW

Presenter: Frederick Prigge, IVI

Authors: Frederick Prigge, Innovative Vehicle Institute, St-Jerome QC

This presentation will cover the current market of EV batteries. Technical characteristics and pricing evolution, as well as market segmentation will be covered. Future technologies, readiness and long-term outlook will be examined with a historical perspective. Comparison of different chemistries will be put in compared to a gasoline-powered car. A high-level example will be given on the fast charge capability of different chemistries in regards to price, availability and range to try to answer why titanate based anodes are not gaining adoption in the market. Finally, some tips on what to believe in big announcements will be covered.

 

TS12-2 THE EVOLUTION OF ELECTRIC VEHICLE LOAD MANAGEMENT: WHERE WE ARE TODAY AND WHERE THE INDUSTRY IS HEADING

Presenter: Eric Mallia, FleetCarma

Authors: Eric Mallia, FleetCarma, Waterloo ON

With increased interest in plug-in electric vehicles from consumers, workplaces, and fleets, utilities are exploring new business models to realize manageable load growth from their residential and commercial customers. The main challenges that utilities are faced with in order to maximize the benefits that EVs can provide to the entire ecosystem is to avoid EV charging during peak periods of electricity demand. The problem requires a peak load management solution to avoid unplanned capital cost upgrades while realizing the benefits of increasing load growth to stabilize rates into the future.

This presentation will provide a summary of the various approaches used by utilities to support and enhance electric vehicle adoption and smart grid integration. We will review results from various EV load management projects, including the use of price signals and direct-control to optimize load growth when most advantageous to the electricity grid. The end result of the presentation seeks to provide audience members with a framework for considering how to prepare for, and support, manageable load growth from EVs in their utility’s service territory.

 

 

TS12-3 TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIFICATION AND ONTARIO ELECTRICITY SYSTEM OUTLOOK

Presenter: Simon Zhang, IESO

Authors: Simon Zhang, Independent Electricity System Operator, Toronto ON

Over the past decade, Ontario’s electricity system has retired it’s coal fleet and replaced it with cleaner sources. Looking forward, the electricity system is well positioned to continue to meet provincial needs, while at the same time adapting to significant change across the sector. Electrification of the transportation sector, including electric vehicles and public transit, has been garnering much attention over the last few years with its potential to be an economical and clean alternative to fossil fuel powered engines. The power system planning outlooks anticipate electricity demand growth in the transportation sector as part of Ontario’s climate change strategy.

 

 

Conference II

TS13 | Smart Deployment of Infrastructure/Déploiement intelligent de l'infrastructure

Moderator / Modérateur
Daniel Carr
Manager of Smart Grid Projects at Alectra Solutions Inc.

 

TS13-1 SOFTWARE AIDED PLANNING TOOL FOR CHOOSING THE VEHICLE / INFRASTRUCTURE / CHARGING STRATEGY OF BUS LINES WITH THE HELP OF MODELLING, LABORATORY MEASUREMENTS AND ROAD TESTS

Presenter: Alexander Bunzel University of Technology Dresden, Dresden/Sachsen/Germany

Authors: Alexander Bunzel, University of Technology Dresden, Dresden, Sachsen, Germany, Bernard Bäker, University of Technology Dresden, Dresden, Sachsen, Germany

Based on the gained knowledge in the electrification of the bus line 79 in the City of Dresden including the integration of a high voltage battery system into a conventional bus, the technical configuration of a pantographic recharge station, as well as a telematics based transmission of measurement data, a software aided planning tool is developed. This tool is used in further electrification initiatives of the City of Dresden and continually optimized.

Combined with laboratory measurements of the used cells, selectable bus lines shall be analyzed by their scientific and technological feasibility of getting electrified. Therefore, the overall methodology includes measurements of aging processes from different cell-technologies, energetic simulations and dedicated test rides. The goal is to provide highly precise prognoses about the required kind of battery, charging infrastructure and charging management.
This contribution presents the lessons-learned gained out of the successfully completed electrification of the bus line 79, the current state of the derived planning tool, as well as brief outlook into the current electrification initiatives in which the tool is used.

 

TS13-2 ELECTRIC VEHICLE FAST CHARGING STATIONS ACROSS TCH (TRANS-CANADA HIGHWAY)

Presenters: Elad Barak, eCAMION

Authors: Elad Barak, eCAMION, Toronto ON

Transportation represents one of the largest challenges that Canada faces in achieving its emission reduction targets. It causes more than one-quarter of Canada’s greenhouse gas pollution. To encourage drivers to switch to EV, a widespread network of charging stations should be deployed. Driving within a city’s boundary an EV could usually be charged overnight. The real challenge is when a long distance trip is required. It makes no sense to drive an EV between cities if one must stop to charge the EV for six to eight hours. As a solution eCAMION offers to deploy a sufficient network of Level 3 chargers throughout Canada to support interurban traveling with a 15 to 20-minute charging time.

There are a few challenges with deploying Level 3 chargers. eCAMION’s innovative approach is to use its ESS. The technology behind the ESS is fully developed and allows DC2DC charging which is both faster and more efficient. Using an ESS as a buffer between the grid and the EV mitigates all of the challenges in a cost effective &simple solution.

 

 

TS13-3 SUPPORTING REGIONAL COLLABORATION FOR RURAL APPLICATION OF ELECTRIC VEHICLE CHARGING INFRASTRUCTURE

Presenter: Megan Lohmann, Community Energy Association (BC)

Authors:Megan Lohmann, Community Energy Association, Vancouver BC

The Kootenay EV Strategy is the first example of a community-driven, collaborative approach to regional electric vehicle charging station connectivity in a rural context. The project is a collaboration of 3 regional districts and over 25 communities in British Columbia.

Whereas in densely populated, high-growth regions of Canada, public transportation and urban design can be effective approaches GHG emission reduction, opportunities for addressing transportation-sector emissions in the rural context is limited. The distance between communities and the limited inter-community public transit options contribute to the dependence on personal vehicles for transportation in the Kootenays. Transitioning to electric vehicles is one of the few opportunities for significant GHG emission reductions in the transportation sector within the Kootenays.

The collaborative deployment of strategically sited Level 2 (approximately 40) and DC Fast Charging stations (approximately 10) is unprecedented, yet is an approach that could be replicated by other rural regions across Canada. Combined with broad outreach and communications, this project will lead to accelerated EV uptake and emissions reductions, and become a demonstration to rural regions across Canada.

 

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EV2017VÉ Conference & Trade Show
May 29th to June 1st, 2017 | Hilton-Toronto, Markham, Ontario, CANADA

Mark your calendar for EV2017VÉ Conference & Trade Show! Don’t miss out unique plenary and technical sessions, academic workshops and technical tours! Our popular Ride N’ Drive for the general public will be taking place on May 29, 2017.

Organized by

Electric Mobility Canada

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