TUESDAY, MAY 30

08:00 – 09:00

Foyer

Continental Breakfast/Petit déjeuner

09:00 – 10:30

Conference III

Opening Plenary Session/Séance plénière d’ouverture

Simultaneous Interpretation / Interprétation simultanée

Frank Scarpitti
Mayor of Markham

 

Paul Evans
Deputy Minister
Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change
Government of Ontario

James Scongack
Vice-President, Corporate Affairs
Bruce Power

Jeff Lyash
President & CEO
Ontario Power Generation

Catherine Kargas
Board Chair, Electric Mobility Canada
Vice-President, MARCON

10:30 – 11:00

Foyer

Networking Break/Pause réseautage

11:00 – 12:00

Conference III

TS01 | Charging Network Planning and Deployment/Planification et déploiement d'un réseau de recharge

Moderator / Modérateur
Alec Tsang
EV Infrastructure Program Manager at BC Hydro

 

TS01-1 SUPPORTING THE ADOPTION OF ELECTRIC VEHICLES IN ONTARIO: THE ELECTRIC VEHICLE CHARGERS ONTARIO (EVCO) PROGRAM AND THE CLIMATE CHANGE ACTION PLAN

Presenter: Matthew Haley, Ontario Government

Authors: Kimberly Scratch, Ontario Ministry of Transportation, Toronto ON; Iris Fawcett, Ontario Ministry of Transportation, Toronto ON; Dale Marsden, Ontario Ministry of Transportation, Toronto ON; Matthew Haley, Ontario Ministry of Transportation, Toronto ON

Through the Electric Vehicle Chargers Ontario (EVCO) program, Ontario is creating a network of fast-charging public electric vehicle (EV) stations across Ontario to support inter-city and in-city travel. With an initial $20 million investment, the government is now working with 24 private and public sector partners to build a network of fast-charging stations in cities, along highways and at workplaces and public places across Ontario. In total, the network will comprise close to 500 charging stations at over 250 unique locations and implementation is underway. This presentation will summarize the considerations that went into building the network, lessons learned in the process of developing and implementing this program and how this work is shaping our future plans and vision for EV infrastructure in Ontario.

On June 8, 2016, Ontario released its Climate Change Action Plan (CCAP). Many measures in the CCAP target encouraging the adoption of EVs and supporting existing EV owners through policies, regulations, infrastructure and education. This presentation will also illustrate the suite of supportive activities Ontario is undertaking to support EVs and how they will help Ontario achieve its greenhouse gas emission reduction targets.

 

 

TS01-2 DO THE CURRENT CHARGING INFRASTRUCTURE DEPLOYMENT PLANS MATCH THE EV ROLL-OUT TARGETS?

Presenter: Simon Ouellette, Charge Hub

Authors: Simon Ouellette, ChargeHub (by Mogile Tech), Montreal QC

The relationship between the number of electric vehicles on the road and the charging infrastructure to support these cars is a subject that comes up often in discussions on how to increase EV uptake. However, despite having both in place and growing for the past 5 years, analyses on the relationship between the two, that goes beyond just the quantity of each, have been very sparse.

 

TS01-3 THE DESIGN OF ELECTRIC VEHICLE CHARGING NETWORK

Presenter: Kai Huang, McMaster

Authors: Kai Huang, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario; Pavlos Kanaroglou; Xiaozhou Zhang

The promotion of Electric Vehicles (EVs) has become a key measure of the governments in their attempt to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. However, range anxiety is a big barrier for drivers to choose EVs over traditional vehicles. Installing more charging stations in appropriate locations can relieve EV drivers’ range anxiety. To determine the locations of public charging stations, we propose two optimization models for two different charging modes – fast and slow charging – which aim at minimizing the total cost while satisfying certain coverage goal. After applying the models to Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area (GTHA) and to Downtown Toronto, we show that the proposed models are practical and effective in determining the locations of charging stations.

 

Conference II

TS02 | Commercial Fleets/Parcs commerciaux

Moderator / Modératrice
Stephanie Medeiros
EV Charging Sales Manager at ABB Canada

 

TS02-1 NORDRESA: NEW CONCEPT FOR FULL ELECTRIC CARBON-FREE PARCEL DELIVERIES - DESIGN, PROTOTYPING AND OPERATION IN MONTREAL

Presenter: Frederick Prigge, Innovative Vehicle Institute ; Sylvain Castonguay, Nordresa

Authors: Frederick Prigge, Innovative Vehicle Institute, St-Jerome QC ; Sylvain Castonguay, Nordresa, Montréal, QC ; Marc Daigneault, Nordresa, Laval QC

The Nordresa company, with some help from IVI, has designed, built and tested a full EV step van for parcel couriers during the summer and fall 2016. Nordresa has developed an advanced ultra-efficient drive train for commercial vehicles, filling the gap between the technology and the commercial vehicle operation. By offering an efficient drive, a well sized battery pack and by using its extensive knowledge, the company is now offering a technical solution that meets the requirements of clients such as Purolator.

The prototype has been placed in operation since December 8 and is in operation since then. The first unit showcase a 2.2 ton payload, a maximum speed of about 95 km/h and a range from 85 to 135 km on a single charge. Thanks to its core components sizing and its use of automotive components, Nordresa is capable of offering a solution that will offer a viable ROI and 10 years durability.

TS02-2 GRID STORAGE OF ELECTRICITY THROUGH SECOND-LIFE USE OF ELECTRIC VEHICLE BATTERIES IN A MIXED BATTERY ARRAY

Presenter: Benjamin Thompson, Dalhousie University

Authors: Benjamin Thompson, Dalhousie University, Halifax NS ; Lukas Swan, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS

We are investigating the re-use of electric vehicle batteries for second-life energy storage. EV batteries are expected to retain 75% of their capacity at the end of their automotive lifespan. These batteries are otherwise going to be disposed of or recycled, with few good options available for recycling. We propose they be collected in bulk and re-used until their capacity is greatly diminished. By doing so, we delay their entry into the waste stream, and create value for vehicle owners who otherwise would have to pay a recycling fee. It is strongly suggested that a key component of the renewable electric grid is storage capacity, which usually comes at a premium price. Used EV batteries would be a much cheaper source of capacity, and would become cheaper in lockstep with the dropping price of batteries. Our research differs from that of automotive groups by our interest in mixed battery usage, local supply and safety-focused design. At scale, such technology could supply thousands of MWh of storage for the grid.

 

 

 

 

TS02-3 A NEW ERA IN PASSENGER MOBILITY: THE CALGARY AIRPORT COMPACT TRANSIT SYSTEM

Presenter: Frédéric Faulconnier, FPInnovations

Authors: Frédéric Faulconnier, Groupe PIT, FPInnovations, Montréal QC

The presentation deals with the Calgary Airport Authority iconic electric shuttles (YYC LINK) which would transport half of the 14.5 Million passengers from the main terminal to the new international terminal every year. This transportation system is the most important component of this connectivity program. It inlcudes a fleet of 20 electric shuttles which are in operation since October 2016.

Conference I

TS03 | EVs in Multi-unit Residential Buildings/VÉ en condos

Moderator / Modératrice
Charlotte Argue
Assistant Manager, Climate Change and Air Quality at Fraser Basin Council

TS03-1 BUILDING CODE AND MULTI-UNIT EVOLVING LESSONS FROM LEADER JURISDICTIONS

Presenter: Travis J. Allan, DeMarco Allan LLP

Authors: Travis J. Allan, DeMarco Allan LLP, Toronto, Ontario ; Jonathan McGillivray, DeMarco Allan LLP, Toronto, Ontario

As more jurisdictions seek to increase electric vehicle (EV) uptake, policymakers have increasingly recognized the importance of ensuring that buildings allow for the installation and use of EV supply equipment (EVSE). This presentation will discuss how leader jurisdictions are grappling with emerging technical and policy challenges and opportunities including electrical distribution capacity limitations, challenges particular to multi-unit residential buildings, existing vs. new building issues and evolving EVSE and EV smart charging technologies. It will also provide a summary of elements to consider when developing a building code and multi-unit residential EVSE policy. To support this discussion, the presentation will draw on areas of consensus and variation between leader jurisdictions including the states of California and Hawaii, the province of Ontario, Boulder County and the cities of Vancouver New York.

TS03-2 ELECTRIC VEHICLE CHARGER INSTALLATION IN MULTI-DWELLING AND CONDOS: THE IMPLICATION THE COMPANY RVE IN QUEBEC

Presenter: Marie-Pier Corbeil, RVE

Authors: Marie-Pier Corbeil, RVE, Montreal QC; David Corbeil, RVE, Montreal QC

The purpose of this presentation is to share how we managed to develop a company making electric vehicle (EV) charger installation more accessible in a multi-dwelling and condos context on the Quebec territory. By designing an innovative product – the charge controller for EV – RVE has solved a technical problematic by now allowing co-owners to have an EV charger powered by their private electrical infrastructure. By setting up a consulting service, the company responded to a lack of expertise available to help condominium unions and managers in setting up EV charger in their building. With this product and service, RVE wants to ensure that any person residing in a condominium in Quebec can have an EV charger installed in its private parking lot. By sharing the solutions developed and the success of our company, we hope to inspire the community to become more interested in developing solutions to the problems on the field that hamper the diffusion of EV charging.

 

TS03-3 RESIDENTIAL CHARGING SOLUTIONS IN MULTI-FAMILY BUILDINGS

Presenter: Lyuba Wolf, ChargePoint

Authors: Lyuba Wolf, ChargePoint, Campbell CA USA

While the majority of all EV charging takes place at home, residential charging use cases are far from homogeneous. Drivers, building owners, and property managers encounter a wide range of charging infrastructure challenges in apartments, condos, and HOAs, all of which may be different with assigned and community parking. These issues become increasingly important as policymakers consider how to increase access to and manage energy associated with residential charging in multifamily residences.

This presentation will cover the wide range of infrastructure, electrical, maintenance, energy management, and other issues that drivers, building stakeholders, and policy makers should take into account as they consider residential charging solutions outside of single-family home environments.

 

TS03-4 INCENTIVIZING THE FUTURE: EV CHARGING PROGRAM FOR MULTI-UNIT RESIDENCES

Presenter: Ryan Davis, Fraser Basin Council

Authors: Ryan Davis, Fraser Basin Council, Vancouver BC; Charlotte Argue, Fraser Basin Council, Vancouver BC; Jim Vanderwal, Fraser Basin Council, Vernon BC

Individuals living in multi-unit dwellings face many barriers to EV adoption, from high costs, to challenging governance and legal issues. Launched in March 2016, the Province of BC’s Multi-Unit Residential Building (MURB) Charging Program provided a cost-incentive in an attempt to encourage EV charging retrofits. In addition to incentivizing the charging stations, the program aimed to reduce barriers for future EV owners, by requiring oversized conduit. Uptake of the program was beyond expectations, but there were several key lessons learned in the process of assisting applicants through the purchase and installation process. Support in navigating some of the non-financial barriers was critical to the program’s success. While this program has not solved the MURB charging challenge, it has been a successful attempt at moving the dial in supporting widespread EV adoption.

 

12:00 – 13:00

Foyer

Luncheon/Dîner

12:30 – 18:00

Valet Parking

Delegate Ride N’ Drive / Essais routiers pour délégués

13:00 – 14:30

Conference III

Tomorrow’s e-Mobility/e-Mobilité de demain

Simultaneous Interpretation / Interprétation simultanée

 

Tomorrow’s mobility will be electric, automated and shared. What this mobility will look like will depend on technology, regulations, social acceptance, partnerships and collaborations between key players. Numerous stakeholders, including auto makers, governments and insurance providers, will contribute to shaping our future mobility ecosystem. This panel will bring together senior decision makers from the auto manufacturing industry, the insurance industry and municipal government to discuss their views of tomorrow’s mobility and how their respective organizations are preparing for this future. Catherine Kargas, EMC Chair, will moderate a panel composed of the CEO of Ford Canada, the COO of Kia Canada, the CEO of Aviva Canada and the Chief Planning Officer of the City of Toronto. It promises to be a lively discussion between key actors in the mobility space.

Gregory Dean Somerville
President and CEO
Aviva Canada Inc.

Marco Viviani
Vice-president Strategical Development
Communauto

Jennifer Keesmat
Chief Planner & Executive Director
City of Toronto

Ted Lancaster
Vice President & Chief Operating Officer
Kia Canada Inc.

14:30 – 15:00

Foyer

Networking Break/Pause réseautage

15:00 – 16:30

Conference III

TS04 | The Big EV Picture/Les VÉ à grande échelle

Moderator / Modérateur
Devin MacCarthy
Vice President, Public Affairs at Canadian Electricity Association

TS04-1 CANADA’S ELECTRIC VEHICLE POLICY REPORT CARD

Presenter: Suzanne Goldberg, SFU-START

Authors: Suzanne Goldberg, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver BC ; Jonn Axsen, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver BC; Noel Melton, Navius Research, Vancouver BC

Electric vehicles are likely to be a key component in the transition to a lower emissions transportation system, as they can reduce emissions 45% to 98% compared to a gasoline vehicle. Climate change experts suggest that more than 40% of vehicles will need to be electric by 2040 to keep warming under 2 degrees. Across the country interest in electric vehicles is growing and some provinces have put in measures to increase electric vehicle sales. But will these policies be effective? Canada’s Electric Vehicle Policy Report Card evaluates whether these policies are likely to put provinces on track to boost electric vehicle sales to levels needed to achieve emissions targets.

We generate the following conclusions:

  • No Canadian province is currently on track to achieve an “A”.
  • The most effective policies include a Zero Emission Vehicle mandate, strong and long-duration financial incentives and strong taxation on gasoline or carbon pricing.
  • The federal government could position Canada as an international leader.
  • Municipal governments can also play a role implementing building regulations and public charging infrastructure.

TS04-2 A SUSTAINABLE ROLE FOR REGULATED UTILITIES IN THE COMPETITIVE EV CHARGING MARKET

Presenter: Kevin George Miller, ChargePoint

Authors: Kevin George Miller, ChargePoint, Campbell CA USA

Utility policies and plans can have significant impact on the EV and EV charging markets through their influence on electricity rates and infrastructure investment programs. A balance must be struck when bringing regulated monopolies into the competitive EV charging market, as the integration of these two types of markets can either accelerate or put the brakes on the adoption of EVs and EVSE.

This presentation will examine how jurisdictions across North America are shaping the ways in which utilities can play an expanded-yet-sustainable role in the competitive EV charging market. Discussion will include comparative analysis of utility and regulatory approaches, program design, stakeholder engagement, as well as how market participants, utilities, and policy makers can apply lessons learned.

TS04-3 IS TREATING INFRASTRUCTURE AS A SERVICE A VIABLE MEANS TO RECOUPING INVESTMENT IN CHARGING INFRASTRUCTURE?

Presenter: Louis Tremblay, AddÉnergie

Authors: Louis Tremblay, AddÉnergie, Québec City QC

Even with booming EV sales around the world, network operators are currently in a tricky position. They have to assume high infrastructure costs for a rather small EV market penetration. While partnering up with utilities and profiting from government initiatives may offer some cues, a comprehensive business model has yet to be drafted. To fully understand where the opportunities may lie, we need to project into 2030, when the market will shift from an early adopter market to a mainstream market. Even though DIY and compromises are acceptable for early adopters, peace of mind, security and turnkey solutions are winning big in the mass market. A market where clients would rather take advantage of a monthly fee service, and where charging solutions will stop being treated as infrastructure, and instead become a service. While guaranteeing access to the latest technology and savings on electricity bills, infrastructure as a service is a promising way to address the future of EV charging for all stakeholders – network operators, clients and utilities.

TS04-4 CAN UTILITY DSM INCLUDE EVS? HOW POLICYMAKERS AND REGULATORS CAN SUPPORT EVS BY ADJUSTING THEIR DSM FRAMEWORKS

Presenter: Philippe Dunsky, Dunsky

Authors: Philippe Dunsky, Dunsky Energy Consulting, Montreal QC ; Jeff Turner, Dunsky Energy Consulting, Montreal QC

Utilities across Canada have long been tasked with implementing demand-side management (DSM) programs. Historically, DSM has sought to minimize load growth, for three reasons: to defer new capital investments, to reduce the need to operate highly-polluting power plants, and to save consumers money. In all cases, DSM has been viewed synonymously with “saving energy”, as if managing demand necessarily implies using less of it.
In many ways, the arrival of EVs upsets the DSM applecart. While EVs achieve many of the same goals – cleaner air, lower operating costs – they do so by increasing electricity demand.

Based on our extensive experience advising governments and regulators across Canada on their DSM frameworks, we will address how regulators and policymakers can align DSM and EV goals. Specifically:

1. How can DSM frameworks be adjusted to accommodate EVs,
2. How can utility-driven EV adoption be made to count toward energy saving goals?
3. How should EV costs and benefits be accounted for by utility regulators?
4. How can EVs support demand response programs and peak load targets?”

15:00 – 16:30

Conference I

TS05 | Consumer and Market Perspectives/Perspectives du marché et des clients

Moderator / Modérateur
Matt Stevens
CEO at FleetCarma

TS05-1 AN EVALUATION OF THE EV LANDSCAPE IN THE EUROPEAN MARKET

Presenter: Daniel Savu, FleetCarma

Authors: Daniel Savu, FleetCarma, Waterloo ON

We have seen the impact that government incentives can have to support growth of EVs in various local and international markets. Typically, the markets with more financial support tend to be leading the way for EV adoption. However, the European market in particular has provided a mixture of policies and practices relating to incentives, education, infrastructure, and innovation from the public and private sectors that provide an insightful case study. Due to several cultural, industry, and political factors, the European market has provided a variety of strategies to support the proliferation of plug-in electric vehicles.

This presentation will provide an evaluation of the various European markets and contrast those to the Canadian market to highlight insights and lessons learned over the past 5 years of EV adoption. Included in this presentation will be a deep dive assessment with case studies of EV leadership from various stakeholders such as governments, fleets, and utilities.

 

TS05-2 DRIVING EV OWNERSHIP IN THE GTHA - A SURVEY OF EV OWNERS AND NON-OWNERS

Presenter: Cara Clairman, Plug’n Drive ; Josipa Petrunic, CUTRIC

Authors: Cara Clairman, Plug’n Drive, Toronto ON ; Josipa Petrunic, CUTRIC, Toronto ON

There are approximately 8,000 plug-in electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles in Ontario, a figure steadily increasing since their market introduction in 2011. Despite rapid annual growth rates, there is virtually no information pertaining to the demographic profile and consumer behaviour patterns of Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area (GTHA) early EV adopters. The gap in available information serves as a barrier to targeted marketing and educational efforts which have the potential to limit the commercial uptake. We conducted a comprehensive survey of approximately 200 EV owners as well as 1,000 ICE car owners to understand their beliefs, values, knowledge about EVs and car purchase behaviour. This survey assesses the relationship of critical information amongst gasoline and diesel vehicle owners and EV owners to understand how household information, vehicle preferences, perceived driving patterns, purchase decisions, and potential incentives impact impressions of the state of the local EV market. The objective of this research is to provide indication as to how public policy and industry tactics can best reflect the interests of a growing EV population.

 

TS05-3 ALTERNATIVE FUEL VEHICLE SURVEY

Presenter: Suzanne Goldberg, SFU-START

Authors: Suzanne Goldberg, SFU-START, Vancouver BC ; Jonn Axsen SFU-START, Vancouver BC; Christine Kormos, SFU-START, Vancouver BC; Zoe Long, SFU-START, Vancouver BC ; Amy Miele, SFU-START, Vancouver BC

Electrified vehicles have the potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Successful deployment of these vehicles will depend on the readiness of mainstream consumers to purchase and use them. Limited awareness and understanding of these technologies, as well as constrained availability and charging access are among the key barriers to adoption, but much remains unknown about Canadian consumers’ “readiness” to integrate these technologies into their daily lives. This study addresses this knowledge gap. Building on our 2013 and 2014 Canadian Plug-in Electric Vehicle Surveys we design a comprehensive survey of over 2000 new vehicle buyers in Canada, and assess consumers’ social and technical “readiness” for battery electric, plug-in hybrid, hybrid, and hydrogen fuel cell. Data from the survey identify and characterize the potential markets for plug-in electric and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. These data provide vital information for the design of policy and product strategy, and outreach and marketing activity by identifying: the demographics, motivations, technological readiness, lifestyles and values; vehicle and charging preferences, and; constraints and opportunities of key consumer segments and markets.

 

TS05-4 THE POTENTIAL EVOLUTION OF EVS TO THE CONSUMER MAINSTREAM IN CANADA: A GEOGRAPHIC SEGMENTATION APPROACH

Presenter: Mark Ferguson, MITL – McMaster

Authors: Mark Ferguson, McMaster Institute for Transportation and Logistics, Hamilton ON ; Chris Higgins, McMaster Institute for Transportation and Logistics, Hamilton ON ; Moataz Mohamed, McMaster Institute for Transportation and Logistics, Hamilton ON

After several years on the market, plug-in electric vehicles have achieved only a small audience of adopters among Canadian consumers. The question of if or when electric vehicles will move more into the consumer mainstream remains an open one. To assist in this regard, this research reports on a geodemographic analysis that leverages results from a stated preference survey of over 20,000 Canadian households. This is one of the largest surveys of its kind anywhere in the world and offers an opportunity to characterize, in considerable detail, the potential adoption landscape in Canada. Results suggest that there is widespread openness among Canadian households to the value proposition offered by PHEV and BEV powertrains but that the spatial patterns manifest themselves differently. There are distinctions within and between metropolitan regions, between urban and rural areas and between provinces. Other differences are revealed among demographic sub-segments. Interesting spatial sub-markets are identified and characterized. Taken together, the results offer considerable insight into how the transition of EVs to the mainstream will likely unfold in Canada.

 

15:00 – 16:30

Conference II

University R&D Roundtable/Table ronde R&D – Université

The University and R&D Roundtable is to feed the Canadian innovation strategy on how to make Canada a global leader in advanced clean transportation technology solutions, including hardware, software and systems solutions.  The participants will be invited to share their views on how

  1. To foster collaboration at the national level in the development of cutting edge technologies, services, and solutions for Canadian automotive manufacturers, suppliers and innovators through co-financed industry- academic collaborations.
  2. To create a series of robust automotive innovation clusters integrating Ontario’s automotive manufacturing and supply chain with relevant technology and transportation start-ups, small to mid-sized enterprises (SMEs), original equipment manufacturers (OEMS) and large global corporations active in other provinces across the country.
  3. To organize, coordinate, and support the clustered growth of R&D related to alternatively fueled propulsion systems for vehicles (including electric and fuel cell propulsion) as well as signaling and external control systems (i.e. autonomous vehicle controls), onboard-connected car systems, and lightweight materials.

The roundtable will be initiated by presentations on recent outcomes, best practices and lesson learned from NSERC-Automotive Partnership Canada funded projects, Pan-Canadian academic network CaRPE-FC and from  InnovÉÉ Consortium in Quebec.

Eric Baril is program leader of Vehicle Propulsion Technologies
at National Research Council Canada, Automotive
and Surface Transportation Portfolio.

 

Alexandre Beaudet
is Program Manager at Montreal-based InnovÉÉ.

 

Dr. Titichai Navessin is the Managing Director
of the CaRPE-FC Network.

 

Benoit Boulet, P.Eng., Ph.D., SMIEEE, is Associate Dean (Research & Innovation) of the Faculty of Engineering at McGill University and an Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

16:30

Conference II

Student Competition/Concours étudiant

Participating teams / Équipes participantes :

  1. Université de Sherbrooke
  2. Red River College
  3. University of Waterloo

18:00 – 19:30

Foyer

Networking Evening/Soirée réseautage

OUR PARTNERS

EV2017VÉ Conference & Trade Show
May 29th to June 1st, 2017 | Hilton-Toronto, Markham, Ontario, CANADA

Mark your calendar for EV2017VÉ Conference & Trade Show! Don’t miss out unique plenary and technical sessions, academic workshops and technical tours! Our popular Ride N’ Drive for the general public will be taking place on May 29, 2017.

Organized by

Electric Mobility Canada

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